Halfling Creation Myth log

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Sahaegin says, "My people, the Halflings, are a very old race."

Sahaegin says, "For thousands of years we had no written history.. we passed myth down from generation to generation via story-tellilng"

Sahaegin smiles.

Sahaegin says, "I will begin tonight's talk with our oldest creation myth"

Sahaegin says, "It is central to all our beliefs"

Sahaegin says, "and it is sacred to us because it connects us with our ancestors."

Sahaegin smiles.

Sahaegin closes her eyes for a moment and inhales. She raises her hands briefly, nods and then opens her eyes.

Sahaegin smiles.

Sahaegin says, "In the beginning, the Land was everything, a Mother rich and bountiful. She was and still is both the Land and one of the Old Ones. She called to the fierce denizens of the EverForest, the old place of time and mystery."

Sahaegin says, "Answering her call, there came from the forest a grey wolf whose destiny was The Mother's will. She gave him a wife, a puma both sleek and fast."

Sahaegin says, "They traveled across the plains and when they were camped near the source of the Tghigha River in sight of a tall mountain, their first son was born. They named him Mhoraga."

Sahaegin says, "Time passed and to them was given two more sons. These they named Brugha and Malghava, and together the three Brothers ran across the plains and became fast as the wind."

Sahaegin says, "The Old Brother of the Wood taught them to fashion bows, and they became skillful archers. The Sister of the Plains showed the Brothers where the wild pony ran in herds that covered the Land for miles. " > Elanus joins Lunafleur's group. > Tierus whispers, "See, abs'lutely anythin' cin 'ave children t'gither. E'en pumas an' wolves."

Sahaegin says, "They were crafty, managing to catch three of the horses, steeds with speed and cunning. Taming the beasts, the Brothers rode the plains astride the ponies, bonding together as comrades and allies."

Sahaegin says, "Seeing the Brothers and their accomplishments, Father Sky was wise."

Sahaegin says, "Drawing them together, he appeared to them as the Wind and told them they must each go away in a different direction, to establish households and homes."

Sahaegin says, "The Father bade them be strong and fierce in protecting these households. The Mother bade them be always true to each other, and once a year to come together in the Trine to find agreement on all things through compromise and shared bonds of origin."

Sahaegin says, "This the Brothers did."

Sahaegin says, "The first, Mhoraga, went north into the harsh territory of the steppes. He founded a household of fierce horse warriors, with a nature both unrelenting and fair. Members of Tribe Mhoraga were reared on snow and mare's milk, and the hunt was everything."

Sahaegin says, "The Mhoraga kept few herds, merely those necessary to supplement hunting and to make the felt for their tents. They roamed the steppes, finding joy and strength in its beauty and its savage nature."

Sahaegin says, "They traded beautifully cured skins and the spoils of the hunt with the Malghava and Brugha for other household necessities."

Sahaegin says, "Brugha traveled north and east, following the frost line on the north with the edge of what the halflings called the EverForest on the south."

Sahaegin says, "He settled in a country rich with game and with rivers teeming with the salmon and the trout. His descendants became both hunters and fishermen, also keeping herds of goats and sheep for their wool."

Sahaegin says, "From this, the Brugha made soft, warm garments and thick felt for use in covering their round tents or "gers"."

Sahaegin says, "The last brother, Malghava, traveled south until he reached the rich, cool lands his descendents call the Shirelands."

Sahaegin says, "Much of the territory was a vast pastureland, where horses, sheep and goats thrived. The Malghava Tribe became the least nomadic of the Trinity of the Truefolk, preferring instead to spin an unsurpassed quality of wool, which they wove into all types of garments."

Sahaegin says, "They made pottery, known for its beautiful tribal decoration."

Sahaegin says, "They gathered rich harvests of grains and berries that grew in the short, northern summer season."

Sahaegin says, "And they made homes by burrowing into the hillsides, and carving warm dwellings within."

Sahaegin says, "That is our oldest myth"