Darlita's Sticks

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Darlita's Case of Sticks were given out to about two dozen adventurers, maybe more or less, in the year 5099. These special case were to be used only when her Gypsy Troupe scryed in scheduled sessions. Each case was attuned to a gypsy.

The case, a polished haon case, could be activated by Tap, which would cause the painted stick to fall out. Each stick was painted with a number in red.

One of the gypsies, Anghosina, came up with translations for them that were Proverbs. The Proverbs are posted below.

Sticks 1 through 10

Stick 1:

The Turramzzyrian Empire began with the fall of a great city-
Two generals strove to be the conqueror-
One threw up walls around it, but the mightiest-
Could break them down to claim the throne.

Stick 2:

The dead trees break into green once more-
The woods are alive with buzzing life-
The immortal peach tree gives forth its fruit-
And all the lost find their way home.


Stick 3

The mother sparrow builds with clay against a storm-
The traveller struggles against the driving rain-
Her fledgelings huddle inside the nest-
But clay melts and falls, All efforts futile

Stick 4

The hero was stronger than two minotaurs-
He could cross three rivers in one leap-
But all his strength was of no use-
Against false claims by evil men.

Stick 5

put recite A gale tore apart the garden's flowers-
Leaving only broken plants in every bed-
Kind folk took pity upon the shattered lawn-
Planting new seeds for its rebirth.

Stick 6

Live in the wilderness with ravens as your friends-
Know yourself and do not envy others' wealth-
Every one is capable of finding their own bread-
But no one gets to see the whole world.

Stick 7
Although he reached a great position-
The wise man did not care for material things-
He brewed instead the stars of the sky-
Forging immortality in his earthly crucible.

Stick 8
The turtle dove invades the home of the magpie-
Leaving one a thief, one homeless, both discontent-
When plants of different natues twist together-
No one can possibly tell what they hide.

Stick 9
Why bother with the pain of hate and greed?-
As the moon lights the traveler's path-
So too can your conscience guide you-
Let your heart be like the moon-
Full bright and clear.

Stick 10
The trees form a green curtain by the river-
I sleep in their shade in summer, when the light is long-
Watching the swallows take their playful path-
Among the gentle breezes and hanging trees.


11 through 20

Stick 11
Fortune changes quickly, both good and ill-
The bad times end, good luck will come again-
Find the wise man on the mountain-
And his kind words will turn your life around.

Stick 12
Grandfather Ancus fished all day-
Though once a dignitary-
He'd put such things away-
But when his country needed him again-
He ceased fishing to ease his country's pain.

Stick 13
The hermit delights in the rain on his roof-
Beating its pattern against his woven thatch-
He drinks himself to sleep among the apricots-
And hates the wakeful chatter of the birds.

Stick 14
The hillwalker faints from the heat of the sun-
So nature's curse will soon strike you down too-
Like a bird driven by predators from its nest-
You'll find solace in the depths of the forest.

Stick 15
Though his stepmother slandered him to his father's face-
The son loved her dispite her faults-
When illnes brought her near to death-
He gave her medicine and warmed her heart forever.

Stick 16
The river's reeds are tipped with morning dew-
Moonlight bathes the stone courtyard steps-
I hear the neigh of horses on the soft breeze-
Swiftly following the bell's call to rise.

Stick 17
The river's reeds are tipped with morning dew-
Moonlight bathes the stone courtyard steps-
I hear the neigh of horses on the soft breeze-
Swiftly following the bell's call to rise.

Stick 18
Far off the raven falls and the rabbit rises-
So things have been since the start of time-
Believe in Koar and his Way and you'll find wisdom-
Whether you be warrior or bard or empath or rogue.

Stick 19
On the kitchen floor the kitten lies-
Lazily warming herself in the afternoon sun-
Graceful animals always bring good luck-
And should be protected whenever possible.

Stick 20
All names in heaven are unique-
And even earthly things cannot be the same-
Your future is set within the Book of Fate-
Which never confuses praise or blame.

21 through 30

Stick 21
Marriage is a blessed union indeed-
When done in accordance with yin and yang-
The dragon and the phoenix coil together-
Uniting in a sweet dream of love.

Stick 22
The drunken bard wrote of wine and love-
His patron, Cholen, loved verse and song-
When they met, they found-
Mutual solace in the balm of poetry.

Stick 23
Health, fortune, fame - they are all illusion-
Prosperity is only a game played by fools-
The fruit of success tastes sour in the mouth-
Soon you will mourn your dreams of worldly glory.

Stick 24
Life is broken by meaningless quarrels-
Like fallen blossoms drifting over the sea-
You will never find grace behaving like a fool-
All that can leave you is a heap of troubles.

Stick 25
The Empress slew her one true love-
But a shaman took pity and eased her heart-
With dreams of roaming upon the moon-
Her bleoved forever at her side.

Stick 26
The shadows of flowers hang about the doorposts-
The moon reflects the traveller's weary face-
A crane's mournful cry breaks the silent night-
Urging the wanderer to hurry back home.

Stick 27
Your plans are carefully constructed-
But fear stops you from completing them-
When time is right, a noble patron-
Will help you establish a comfortable home.

Stick 28
The scholar made a pledge on the bridge-
Saying 'I shall not come here again-
Unless I come in a planaquin'-
Fortune blessed him, he crossed the bridge again.

Stick 29
Fish on my plate, flowers by my side-
I enjoy the evening with a sip of cool wine-
The tide is rising, the boat is moving-
My heart is joyous, my spirit high.

Stick 30
The best thing, I tell you, is not to aim too high-
A flying eagle will not see the fatal arrow-
Gathering wood, you may uncover a snake-
And you will regret forever its poisonous bite.

31 through 40

Stick 31
Two scholars went to the capital for examinations-
One passed and stayed, one failed and returned-
Carrying a scroll from his friend-
He fell ill, but eventually, came home!

Stick 32
He endured the bleak north for nineteen years-
His captured banner trailing upon distant sands-
Snow was his only food, his heart was full of woe-
And his only companions the roltons he tended.

Stick 33
You do not see the valuables within your grasp-
So you turn around and around in a vain search-
Relax and wait for the arrival of another-
For they can tell you where the treasure is hidden.

Stick 34
He was a great warrior, but ugly and scarred-
And so found himself rejected by two mighty Emperors-
But a Lord saw his value, beneath the scars-
Sought him through the night and won his aid.

Stick 35
When the gods choose a man for greatness-
They first make him suffer terribly in body and soul-
Happiness does not come to anyone easily-
There is always a reason for wealth or poverty.

Stick 36
You are ill and caught up in problems, but be calm-
Many riches are waiting for you still-
A clever monkey can loose himself from a golden chain-
And roam freely about the mountains of home.

Stick 37
The Empress slew her one true love-
But a shaman took pity and eased her heart-
With dreams of roaming upon the moon-
Her beloved forever at her side.

Stick 38
The shadows of flowers hang about the doorposts-
The moon reflects the traveler's weary face-
A crane's mournful cry breaks the silent night-
Urging the wanderer to hurry back home.

Stick 39
Your plans are carefully constructed-
But fear stops you from completing them-
When time is right, a noble patron-
Will help you establish a comfortable home.

Stick 40
The scholar made a pledge on the bridge-
Saying 'I shall not come here again-
Unless I come in a planaquin'-
Fortune blessed him-
he crossed the bridge again.

41 through 50

Stick 41
Fish on my plate, flowers by my side-
I enjoy the evening with a sip of cool wine-
The tide is rising, the boat is moving-
My heart is joyous, my spirit high.

Stick 42
The best thing, I tell you, is not to aim too high-
A flying eagle will not see the fatal arrow-
Gathering wood, you may uncover a snake-
And you will regret forever its poisonous bite.

Stick 43
Two scholars went to the capital for examinations-
One passed and stayed, one failed and returned-
Carrying a scroll from his friend-
He fell ill, but eventually, came home!

Stick 44
"He endured the bleak north for nineteen years-
His captured banner trailing upon distant sands-
Snow was his only food, his heart was full of woe-
And his only companions the roltons he tended.

Stick 45
You do not see the valuables within your grasp-
So you turn around and around in a vain search-
Relax and wait for the arrival of another-
For they can tell you where the treasure is hidden.

Stick 46
He was a great warrior, but ugly and scarred-
And so found himself rejected by two mighty Emperors-
But a Lord saw his value, beneath the scars-
Sought him through the night and won his aid.

Stick 47
When the gods choose a man for greatness-
They first make him suffer terribly in body and soul-
Happiness does not come to anyone easily-
There is always a reason for wealth or poverty.

Stick 48
The humble cockatrice becomes the great phoenix-
A freedom that no other bird can know-
Higher and higher he soars into the sky-
Leaving miles of clouds far below him.

Stick 49
Although the warrior had great wisdom-
Saving the Empress' skin many a time-
He eventually fell from favor with his mistress-
Left her court, and escped into oblivion.

Stick 50
Fleeing a Lord's wrath, the hero hied to the River-
Where a friendly boatman ferried him over-
The hero offered him his sword in thanks, but he refused-
Placing friendship above material reward.

51 through 64

Stick 51
During the long, long summer dog days-
Everyone is tortured by the burning sun-
But now a calm and soothing breeze has arisen-
The will of the Gods that eases souls.

Stick 52
In the lake, love poems floated on leaves-
Written by a maid in service at the court-
A scholar replied by the same means-
Thus the leaves brought the lovers together.

Stick 53
The Empress' court housed three thousand guests-
No one could say which was the greatest-
One of them complained of being ignored-
Claiming his worth was above all others.

Stick 54
Reflections in rippling water-
Are constantly shifting, never the same -
In Fate, everything is set-
And no advice can help the outcome.

Stick 55
The chief Minister was the wisest of all men-
Loved by good people, feared by the unjust-
He promoted honesty throughout the Lands-
And advised folk to tend to their gardens.

Stick 56
The hidden dagger in water becomes a dragon-
Soaring far into the sky over many leagues-
A story as thus can mean nothing but good-
You will rise high as the result of an ordeal.

Stick 57
Close your ears to rumor and scandal-
Your lot is a harvest of food and fine clothes-
Put all sorrow and woe from your mind-
Place your trust in me and joy will be yours.

Stick 58
One kingdom stood above the other six-
And sought to conquor the whole of the Lands-
But one man united the six together-
And resisted the aggression of the seventh.

Stick 59
As a blazing fire consumes the fuel around it-
Spreading far and wide, sparing nothing-
So fearful death awaits each one of us-
Neither rank nor riches can save us now.

Stick 60
The oracle is ambiguous, who can read it?-
To some it means rebel and you will succeed-
But the honest warrior read it otherwise-
And found to his cost that this meaning was true.

Stick 61
Holding a piece of fine jade is a rare treat-
It should be valued and loved as a worthy item-
Only great wealth can buy such beauty-
Great things deserve great honor, after all.

Stick 62
Last time we sailed we lost our compass-
Today we set forth to search for it again-
Though the first compass was later found-
It is of no use now and all hope is drowned.

Stick 63
Two good friends were in business together-
The richer gave the poorer a larger share-
Such virtue did not go unrewarded, and very soon-
Both became Lords under a great Emperor.

Stick 64
In the bitter cold you came to rest-
You never thanked the hand that feed you-
Now you feed another who is in the cold-
And grow offended when he doesn't thank you.