Gnomish Repair Toolbelt

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Gnomish Repair Toolbelts first debuted at Ebon Gate 2017 in Chisel, Peen and Chamfer, Esq. These can be used to damage or repair certain limited items.

Analyze

You analyze your brown leather toolbelt and sense that the creator has provided the following information:

Looking over the toolbelt and inspecting its finer details, you realize that it will always need to be "a/n (whatever)/(whatever)/toolbelt". The item's article and adjective CAN be changed, but "toolbelt" is the only valid noun.

This is a Gnomish Repair Toolbelt, which means it is scripted to interact both with run-of-the-mill, generic items and with items which have "damaged" text strings stored in them. This toolbelt provides standard messaging when working on generic items, and specific messaging when working on items which are part of the Gnomish Repair System. Items can be set up with "damaged" text strings so that they can interact with the Gnomish Repair System without being scripted. IF SCRIPTED, such items will state in their analysis text that they are part of the system.

If you were to play with the toolbelt, then you'd find that you can analyze, wear, remove, clean, pinch, poke, pull, and twist it.

Clean, pinch, poke, and pull provide standard interactions for generic items. G.R.S items need to be "damaged" in order for the toolbelt to interact with them. TWIST will set a G.R.S. item's long description to one of its four damaged descriptions. When a G.R.S. item is damaged, the same verbs will provide specific messaging as the item is "repaired."

NOTE: This toolbelt currently supports interaction with a limited variety of generic items. These include: shields, goggles, crossbows (mechanical and otherwise), longbows, composite bows, short bows, runestaffs, swords, and axes.

SCRIPT NAME: Gnomish Repair Toolbelt

You might be able to have a talented merchant lighten the brown leather toolbelt for you or deepen its pockets.

Usage

VERB FIRST THIRD
WEAR You wrap the toolbelt around your waist and buckle it, careful that the various handles hang free and clear. XXX unbuckles the toolbelt from his waist and gathers both ends carefully into one hand.
REMOVE You unbuckle the toolbelt from your waist and gather both ends carefully into one hand. XXX wraps the toolbelt around his waist and buckles it, careful that the various handles hang free and clear.
CLEAN (axe, shield) You pluck a thick chamois out of its pocket on your toolbelt and dab it into a tin of neat's-foot oil. Then you set to work renewing the <item>'s leather, whether it be strap, grip, or decoration. Finally, you finish by doubling-up the chamois and giving the entire <item> a thorough buffing. XXX plucks a thick chamois out of its pocket on his toolbelt and dabs it into a tin of neat's-foot oil. Then he sets to work renewing the <item>'s leather, whether it be strap, grip, or decoration. Finally, he finishes by doubling-up the chamois and giving the entire <item> a thorough buffing.
CLEAN (sword) You lift a thick chamois from its pocket on your toolbelt and dab it into a tub of jeweler's rouge. Then you set to work polishing the <sword>'s blade to a mirror finish. XXX lifts a thick chamois from its pocket on his toolbelt and dabs it into a tub of jeweler's rouge. Then he sets to work polishing the <sword>'s blade to a mirror finish.
CLEAN (crossbow) You pluck a thick chamois out of its pocket on your toolbelt and dab it into a tin of neat's-foot oil. Then you set to work renewing the <crossbow>'s leather strap, and finish by doubling-up the chamois and giving the entire <crossbow> a final buffing. XXX plucks a thick chamois out of its pocket on his toolbelt and dabs it into a tin of neat's-foot oil. Then he sets to work renewing the <crossbow>'s leather strap, and finishes by doubling-up the chamois and giving the entire <crossbow> a final buffing.
CLEAN (bow, runestaff) You nab a thick chamois out of its pocket on your toolbelt and dab it into a tub of beeswax. Running the chamois from end-to-end, you spread wax down the <item>'s length, then set to work rubbing it into the grain until the entire weapon possesses a satin sheen. XXX nabs a thick chamois out of its pocket on his toolbelt and dabs it into a tub of beeswax. Running the chamois from end-to-end, he spreads wax down the <item>'s length, then sets to work rubbing it into the grain until the entire weapon possesses a satin sheen.
PINCH (axe) You nab a fine-toothed file out of its loop on your toolbelt and focus your efforts on removing the nicks in the <axe>'s haft. Practiced strokes erase the marks of battle from the <axe>, and you take extra care to feather the newly filed areas into the haft's original contour. XXX nabs a fine-toothed file out of its loop on his toolbelt and focuses his efforts on removing the nicks in the <axe>'s haft. Practiced strokes erase the marks of battle from the <axe>, and he takes extra care to feather the newly filed areas into the haft's original contour.
PINCH (shield) You pluck a fine-toothed file out of its loop on your toolbelt and focus your efforts on removing the nicks in the <shield>'s edges. Practiced strokes with the file deftly remove the marks of battle from the <shield>, and you take extra care to feather the newly filed areas into the toolbelt's original contour. XXX plucks a fine-toothed file out of its loop on his toolbelt and focuses his efforts on removing the nicks in the <shield>'s edges. Practiced strokes with the file deftly remove the marks of battle from the <shield>, and he takes extra care to feather the newly filed areas into the toolbelt's original contour.
PINCH (sword) You snatch a fine-toothed file from its loop on your toolbelt and focus your efforts on putting a new edge on the <sword>. Even, deliberate strokes with the file give the metal the precise angle, and in no time the dull edge has been replaced by one that is razor sharp, if a bit raw. XXX snatches a fine-toothed file from its loop on his toolbelt and focuses his efforts on putting a new edge on the <sword>. Even, deliberate strokes with the file give the metal the precise angle, and in no time the dull edge has been replaced by one that is razor sharp, if a bit raw.
PINCH (crossbow) You take a fine-toothed file from its loop on your toolbelt and focus your efforts on removing the nicks in the <crossbow>'s arms and stirrup. Practiced strokes with the file deftly remove the marks of battle from the <crossbow>, and you take extra care to feather the newly filed areas into the crossbow's original contours. XXX takes a fine-toothed file from its loop on his toolbelt and focuses his efforts on removing the nicks in the <crossbow>'s arms and stirrup. Practiced strokes with the file deftly remove the marks of battle from the <crossbow>, and he takes extra care to feather the newly filed areas into the <crossbow>'s original contours.
PINCH (bow, runestaff) Switching between flat and half-round files, you focus your efforts on removing the nicks in the <item>'s edges. A few strokes with either file, and the marks of battle vanish as you remove just enough wood to return the bow to its original shape. Switching between flat and half-round files, XXX focuses his efforts on removing the nicks in the <item>'s edges. A few strokes with either file, and the marks of battle vanish as he removes just enough wood to return the bow to its original shape.
POKE (axe) You select a coarse-toothed flat file out of its loop on your toolbelt and concentrate on putting a new edge on the blade of the <axe>. Even, deliberate strokes with the file give the metal the precise angle, and in no time the dull edge has been replaced by one that is razor sharp, if a bit raw. XXX selects a coarse-toothed flat file out of its loop on his toolbelt and concentrates on putting a new edge on the blade of the <axe>. Even, deliberate strokes with the file give the metal the precise angle, and in no time the dull edge has been replaced by one that is razor sharp, if a bit raw.
POKE (shield) You selects a pair of pliers from their loop on your toolbelt and take a few moments to tighten the D-rings on the <shield>'s strap. A couple of sharp tugs confirm that your efforts have been successful. XXX selects a pair of pliers from their loop on his toolbelt and takes a few moments to tighten the D-rings on the <shield>'s strap. After a couple of sharp tugs he appears satisfied with his efforts.
POKE (sword) Hefting the <sword>, you test its balance. Dissatisfied, you remove the pommel and slip a lead weight onto the tang, pushing it up inside the grip. Carefully, you replace the pommel and tighten it securely. Hefting the <sword> once more, you nod. Hefting the <sword>, XXX tests its balance. Dissatisfied, he removes the pommel and slips a lead weight onto the tang, pushing it up inside the grip. Carefully, he replaces the pommel and tightens it securely. Hefting the <sword> once more, XXX nods.
POKE (crossbow) One by one you carefully remove the <crossbow>'s gears and dress their teeth with a needle file. Then, producing a needle-spouted flask from your toolbelt, you place a single drop of oil on each spindle before reassembling the entire mechanism. Finally, you work the gears back and forth until they spin effortlessly. One by one XXX carefully removes the <crossbow>'s out of gears and dresses their teeth with a needle file. Then, he produces a needle-spouted flask from his toolbelt and places a single drop of oil on each spindle, before reassembling the entire mechanism. Finally, he works the gears back and forth until they spin effortlessly.
POKE (bow) You realize there's not much more you can do to a <bow> than a chamois or a file can accomplish. N/A
POKE (runestaff) If this <runestaff> had imbedded shards you could do something more for it, but otherwise a buffing with a chamois and clean up with a file is about it N/A
PULL (axe) Unwrapping an oiled whetstone that you've retrieved from your toolbelt's pouch, you pull the <axe>'s blade deliberately across the stone. Repeated, even strokes cover the edge of the axehead from top to bottom. Eventually, you hold the edge at eye level, end-on, and sight along it. The edge is a single black line. You're done. You rewrap the whetstone and put it away. Unwrapping an oiled whetstone that he's retrieved from his toolbelt's pouch, XXX pulls the <axe>'s blade deliberately across the stone. Repeated, even strokes cover the edge of the axehead from top to bottom. Eventually, he holds the edge at eye level, end-on, and sights along it. Apparently satisfied, he rewraps the whetstone and puts it away.
PULL (shield) Drawing a hefty, brass mallet from your toolbelt, you flip the <shield> over and take your time removing dents in its surface with well-placed blows. Constant checks of the <shield>'s front side guide your efforts, and in no time at all every vestige of a dent has been removed. Drawing a hefty, brass mallet from his toolbelt, XXX flips the <shield> over and takes his time removing dents in its surface with well-placed blows. Constant checks of the <shield>'s front side guide his efforts, and in no time at all every vestige of a dent has been removed.
PULL (sword) Unwrapping an oiled whetstone that you've retrieved from your toolbelt's pouch, you pull the <sword>'s blade deliberately across the stone. Repeated, even strokes cover the edge of the <sword> from tip to guard. Eventually, you hold the edge up, end-on, and sight along it. The edge is a single black line. You're done. You rewrap the whetstone and put it away. Unwrapping an oiled whetstone that <he/she>'s retrieved from <his/her> toolbelt's pouch, XXX pulls the <sword>'s blade deliberately across the stone. Repeated, even strokes cover the edge of the <sword> from tip to guard. Eventually, <he/she> holds the edge up, end-on, and sights along it. Apparently satisfied, <he/she> rewraps the whetstone and puts it away.
PULL (crossbow) Carefully, you disassemble the arms of the <crossbow> from the stock and separate them into their individual, layered leaves. Then, with a planishing hammer from your toolbelt, you adjust the arc of each leaf to renew its tensile strength. The whole thing goes back together in a trice, and you finish up by giving it a good rubdown with your chamois. Carefully, XXX disassembles the arms of the <crossbow> from the stock and separate them into their individual, layered leaves. Then, with a planishing hammer from his toolbelt, he adjusts the arc of each leaf to renew its tensile strength. The whole thing goes back together in a trice, and he finishes up by giving it a good rubdown with his chamois.
PULL (bow) You realize there's not much more you can do to a <bow> than a chamois or a file can accomplish. N/A
PULL (runestaff) If this <runestaff> had an orb you could do something more for it, but otherwise a buffing with a chamois and clean up with a file is about it. N/A
TWIST

See Also