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Warning: This page concerns archaic world setting information from the I.C.E. Age of GemStone III. It is not canon in contemporary GemStone IV, nor is it canonical for Shadow World as the details may be specific to GemStone III. It is only historical context for certain very old parts of the game and these things should not be mixed.
The metals and woods of GemStone III mostly had I.C.E. Age analogs in Rolemaster, M.E.R.P., or Shadow World specifically. However, these sometimes had differences in detail with the modern lore, such as whether it was an alloy or other historical contexts. The Rolemaster "Bonus" has the same meaning as our modern materials enchant bonus, and "Resistance" is warding bonus while ST/BF = ST/DU. The listed conversion value is 20 silver pieces for 1 gold piece in the Shadow World Master Atlas 3rd Ed. (page 57), but there is no need for a high degree of consistency between it and the Rolemaster books.

Metals

The word "metals" is used loosely. This includes special minerals, crystals, and volcanic glasses, but leaves out generic real-world materials such as obsidian. There are some SHIFT verb terms that do not exist in the I.C.E. source books, and it is unclear to what extent some of these actually existed in the game. This list also does not include I.C.E. materials that never existed in GemStone.

Arinyark

Modern: Ahnver

Arinyark is a luminous bluish-green mineral that absorbs raw Essence radiation. It is extremely difficult to make into weapons and armors, and with armor it would typically be a laminate on something else to act as a mana battery. There is no modern lore for this material, though "ahnver" does exist in the game. It was one of the words that was changed but was not included in the SHIFT verb. If a confined space were subjected to a large enough concentration of arinyark, it would have the effect of severely dampening the local flows of essence, imposing steep penalties (say 90%) on Essence realm spells.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: -5
Resistance: +30
ST/BF:  ?
Cost Multiplier: 1000x
RM Value: 200 gold/ounce
SW Value: 200 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: Arinyark stores essence radiation like a battery which can then be tapped to renew power points (mana). When coating a full suit of armor with arinyark, it provides +30 to Essence realm resistance rolls (warding) or applies -30 to elemental attacks such as bolts. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1992); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 15)
Shadow World: Same as Rolemaster. Arinyark is an ingredient of the alloy Xenium. (Source: Shadow World Master Atlas, 2nd Edition (1992); Chapter 1.3: Special Elements, page 17) In the Third Edition it is a "metallic element" and those modifiers are +/-50 rather than +/-30. There is a silver-blue metal called Taurith near arinyark deposits which is extremely easy for imbedding Essence realm spells. (2001, page 58)
I.C.E. Age: Arinyark strips are used as a lighting method in the old part of the Crypt of The Graveyard, likely symbolic of The Unlife because it devours the Essence. The extension with the torches is unrelated to the original story. This might have been inspired by the arinyark pillared Great Hall of an Unlife mummy king in the Egyptian themed "Kingdom of the Desert Jewel" source book (1989), which was located in Gethyra on the Bay of Throk on the northern coast of Thuul. The design of the Graveyard is influenced by the Egyptian death religion, and the invoking phrase used to be "Kadaena Throk Farok" rather than "Shadow bind my soul." The deeper part of the necropolis is lit with glowing fungus. There is also an "ahnver-inlaid door" in the Ye Oddity Workshop, which was the privately owned workshop of Lord Odds in the I.C.E. Age.

Black Alloy

Modern: Black alloy

It is an alloy of iron, titanium, and "meteoric metals." It ranges from steel grey to black in color, and does not require special forging equipment. For this reason the "meteoric metal" component presumably does not refer to star iron. While it is not all that uncommon in Rolemaster, it is extremely rare in modern GemStone IV. It was included along with white alloy on a late 1990s table before the modern metals lore was written, along with the lower carbon low and high steel, but its properties were left undefined. In the modern game it is most notably used for ShadowDeath weapons and vambraces.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +20
Resistance: +10
ST/BF:  ?
Cost Multiplier: 500x
RM Value: 100 gold/ounce
SW Value: ?
Game Details
Rolemaster: As described above. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1992); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 15) In the Treasure Companion (1996) it asserts that "black alloys" are "very hard" and incredibly difficult to forge because of their very high carbon content, and that they contain either nickel or molbydenum, but with large fractions of tungsten and vanadium. (Treasure Companion Chapter 3.4.2: Carbon Steel; pages 26, 38)
Shadow World: It is called "Krelin" after its creator, the Iylari smith Krelij who fashioned the dragonhelms with the Dragonlord Oran Jatar, the brother of the famous artificer Tethior who invented white alloy. It is a non-magical alloy of iron, carbon, and other materials. Dull grey. +50 BF ("breakage factor"). (Source: Shadow World Master Atlas, 3rd Edition (2001); Chapter 5.4: Special Weapon Alloys, page 57)
I.C.E. Age: The I.C.E. Age of GemStone III ended prior to the publication of Treasure Companion and the Third Edition of the Shadow World Master Atlas.

Black Eog

Modern: Black ora

Black eog is an unholy metal that inhibits light magic in the same way that white eog does for dark magic. Mechanically, most if not all player spells in GemStone III were technically "light" magic (even if they were violent) in that they used what we call "mana", so this anti-magical property is significantly weaker in the game than in Shadow World. Modernly there is "pure" and "impure" black ora, but in the I.C.E. Age context all ora weapons are alloys. Black eog does not have the mana regeneration and wisdom bonuses of pure black ora, or the spirit regeneration penalty, though this would not be inconsistent. In Shadow World the price per ingot of white and black ora is the same, they are exceptionally rare. In the modern metals lore black ora is much more rare than white ora and they are both pure forms.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +30
Resistance: +30
ST/BF: +15/+30?
Cost Multiplier: 15,000x
RM Value: 2,000? gold/ounce
SW Value: 5,000 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: Black eog is only mentioned as a color variation of normal dully silver-grey eog, which is described as an Elven magical alloy made from mithril, titanium ("durang"), and other unknown materials. It is not described as having special properties of its own as a color variation. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1992); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 15) In the Treasure Companion (1996) eog is only described in its gray form as "true steel" or "true iron." (Treasure Companion Chapter 3.5.3: Enchanted Substances, page 27)
Shadow World: Eog varieties are pure metals in Shadow World, but the weapons are always alloys because it is brittle. Black and white eog have anti-magical properties, unlike ordinary eog. Black eog is unholy in that it can inhibit or even nullify ordinary magic, as opposed to the Dark Essence realms where the power originates in sources such the Unlife or dark gods. In a room covered in 1 inch panels of black eog, most ordinary magic users would not be able to cast spells, but they would still have their power points (unlike kregora which actually drains them.) (Source: Shadow World Master Atlas, 3rd Edition (2001); Chapter 5.4: Magical Materials & Alloys, page 58) The Atlas Addendum (1991) says realm specific inhibitors like black eog should add at least +100 RR, and kregora is at least 10x more potent. (p.79)
I.C.E. Age: Black eog is an unholy metal which uses the game's curse mechanics. There were black eog signet rings that supposedly augmented Council of Light powers in the past, which is surely based on the signet rings of the Priests Arnak. The Spider Temple originally inhibited some of the spell-casting of (light) Channeling users. When it opened spells such as Unstun did not work inside the building. White ora is naturally sanctified in the hands of a cleric, while black ora is naturally cursed. These properties are not mentioned in Shadow World. In general the Eog variants in Rolemaster and Shadow World are more powerful and valuable than the Ora that exists in GemStone.

Boernerine

Modern: Zorchar

Boernerine is an elemental metal from Rolemaster, allegedly made from smelting light elementals with earth spirits, according to one source. In the Elemental Companion (1989) it is an elemental metal made from combining an elemental earth material with elemental light, and has the power to illuminate its surroundings. This is different from the lightning flare property in GemStone. The electricity-earth elemental metal in the Elemental Companion is instead platnite, which has the affect of treating metal armors as if they were several armor classes lower.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: Unknown
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: Unknown
Cost Multiplier: Unknown
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: "Boernerine" allegedly is supposedly made from smelting light elementals with earth spirits, creating items with perpetual magical radiance, though this is a syncretic list mixing metals from numerous game systems. In the canon material it is an elemental metal made from an elemental earth material alloyed with elemental light, creating a weapon with powers of illumination. (Source: The Elemental Companion (1989); Chapter 16.2.5 Elemental Weapon Properties, page 140). "Boernine" is steel or iron that is sufficiently corrupted with elemental light, becoming a shiny black metal that is a better mirror than silver. (Source: Fire & Ice - The Elemental Companion (2002); Chapter 10.0: Elemental Item Enchant, page 101) Corruption gains electricity criticals. (page 104)
Shadow World: There do not appear to be any metals corresponding to the properties of "boernerine" in the Shadow World source books. There is a metal called "electrium" which can be easily imbedded with elemental spells, creating something effectively equivalent to zorchar and all of the others. However, this was not mentioned in early enough sources, and other materials can be imbedded. It would be like using Magic Item Creation (420) on a sword instead of Elemental Blade (411). (Source: Shadow World Master Atlas 3rd Edition (2001); Chapter 5.4: Magical Materials & Alloys, page 58) The ease of imbedding property is not specific to elemental spells. It is a very expensive magical alloy of gold, silver, and iron. 10,000 silver/ounce.
I.C.E. Age: The drake falchion is one of the oldest item drops in the treasure system. It is unclear when exactly feras items first existed as crumbly electric flares instead of flames, and it is unclear to what extent the non-crumbly boernerine existed in the I.C.E. Age. While the elemental metal name and basic concept came from the Elemental Companion (1989), its material property is idiosyncratic to GemStone. In the Elemental Companion (1989), page 8, elemental light inflicts radiation criticals. It can blind or be +30 on darkness creatures.

Catoetine

Modern: Coraesine

Catoetine is supposedly allegedly the "heat-based counterpart of Eog", which is not nearly as effective at holding spells. In the Elemental Companion (1989) it is made by combining an elemental earth material with elemental heat. It makes "weapons of quickness" allowing increased ability to make multiple strikes. Its property is thus speeding things up, such as making a weapon swing faster or more often.

This double strike property exists today with coraesine weapons, though its properties were left unstated on a table of materials properties from the late 1990s. The air flare and backlash hazard properties do not seem to have a Rolemaster origin. It is treated as an elemental metal of fire in the later Elemental Companion (2002) book, though it is seemingly not mentioned in Shadow World.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: Unknown
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: Unknown
Cost Multiplier: Unknown
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: "Catoetine" allegedly is supposedly a heat-based counterpart to Eog, which in the Alchemy Companion has to be subjected to intense cold before working it with heat, and in the Elemental Companion is an alloy of elemental cold and earth. This is a syncretic list mixing metals from numerous game systems. In the canon material catoetine is an elemental metal made from an elemental earth material alloyed with elemental heat, creating a weapon with powers of quickness, facilitating multiple attacks in combat. (Source: The Elemental Companion (1989); Chapter 16.2.5 Elemental Weapon Properties, page 139). "Catoentine" is steel or iron that is sufficiently corrupted by elemental fire, though this creates heat and fire criticals with enough corruption. The elemental metal of air is called Peraltoid. (Source: Fire & Ice - The Elemental Companion (2002); Chapter 10.0: Elemental Item Enchant, page 101 & 105)
Shadow World: There do not appear to be any Elven metals resembling the properties of coraesine. The association of the metal with Elves, particularly the Faendryl in the modern lore, was probably invented for modern GemStone. There is no reason to suspect it is a Dyari metal.
I.C.E. Age: Catoetine presumably had the double strike abilities of coraesine, and the air flares may have been fit onto it in the absence of solid lore justification. The elemental metal of air in the Elemental Companion (1989) is instead Peraltoid, and has the ability to fight on its own, and will begin to fight on its own if it is dropped or its wielder is killed. Notably, the modern lore for coraesine includes a similar concept as Peraltoid, with pure coraesine weapons avenging their wielders when picked up by enemies. In the Elemental Companion (1989) elemental heat can either warm objects or speed them up, and is +30 against cold creatures or combustibles. Elemental Heat inflicts heat and radiation criticals.

Dwarven Steel

Modern: Invar

It is unclear which steel variety should refer to "dwarven steel." White alloy is the dwarven "adacer" in the Treasures of Middle Earth book, which is likely too potent. Low steel or enclantine ("enchanted iron") from Shadow World are closer to the bonus of invar, but are not markedly dwarven in any way. It is likely supposed to be an iron and carbon alloy with a relatively significant amount of carbon, possibly with trace amounts of something more valuable to dwarves, the most logical candidate being mithril. Invar is a processed metal in the modern lore but it is a dwarven secret.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +5
Resistance: +5
ST/BF:  ?
Cost Multiplier: 10x
RM Value: 2 gold/ounce
SW Value:  ?
Game Details
Rolemaster: The "Enchanted Iron" is refined and magically worked, giving the stat bonuses on the right. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1992); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 15) "Adacer" is Dwarven "white alloy" made with coal and titanium (Source: Treasures of Middle Earth), which is a separate entry on the archaic materials table along with low and high steel, and likely too potent to be the basis of invar.
Shadow World: Enclatine is a magically worked "Enchanted Iron" with only a +5 bonus, as opposed to the non-magical "low steel" with the same bonus. However, Enclatine has +50 BF, the breakage factor. Invar does not seem to be that strong.
I.C.E. Age: Dwarven steel may be a descriptor with a minor bonus that was formalized. There is no obvious reason why the term had to be changed.

Elrodnite

Modern: Rhimar

Elrodnite is supposedly allegedly a cousin of Eog that is not as magically potent or as good at holding spells. It resembles zinc and is perpetually surrounded by cold mist. This is usually used defensively with gear designed to obscure the location of the wearer. There is mention of making wands of frost, but seemingly nothing about cold flares. In the Elemental Companion (1989) it an elemental metal made from an elemental earth metal and elemental ice, whereas eog is with elemental cold, and this makes weapons of frost. The weapon can surround the wielder with a freezing mist that obscures their location (in effect it increases defensive bonus), and inflicts greater hit points, but this is not represented as a cold flare property.

There was another material named Illinar that was a rare enchanted form of ice that inflicted cold criticals in weapon and golem forms, but the earliest reference to it seems to be after the I.C.E. Age ended. The Treasure Companion (p. 27, 110) was 1996 or possibly even 2000, and the Construct Companion (p.47) for golems was 2003. The actual page numbers for Treasure Companion references on this page are actually from the 2000 printing. Rhimar is a metal, not magical ice. In contrast the Elemental Companion (2002) treats "megrail" instead as the cold flaring metal.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: Unknown
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: Unknown
Cost Multiplier: Unknown
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: "Elrodnite" is apparently a cold aligned cousin of Eog, though this is a syncretic list fom multiple game systems. The Elemental Companion treats it as an alloy of elemental earth and elemental ice, increasing defensive bonus and hit point damage, but no reference to cold flares. (Source: The Elemental Companion (1989); Chapter 16.2.5 Elemental Weapon Properties, page 139). However, the Elemental Companion of 2002 treats "megrail" as its ice elemental metal with cold criticals after sufficient corruption, instead of mcgrail being darkness oriented. (Source: Fire & Ice - The Elemental Companion (2002); Chapter 10.0: Elemental Item Enchant, page 101 & 105) There is another rare enchanted "true ice" material called Illinar. (Source: Treasure Companion; Chapter 3.5.1: Enchanted Substances, page 27) Its bonus is +20, which is more powerful than rhimar, and there is a sample "staff of illinar" item which describes inflicting an "additional cold critical."
Shadow World: There do not appear to be any metals corresponding to the properties of "elrodnite" in the Shadow World source books. There is a metal called "electrium" which can be easily imbedded with elemental spells, creating something effectively equivalent to rhimar and all of the others. However, this was not mentioned in early enough sources, and other materials can be imbedded. It would be like using Magic Item Creation (420) on a sword instead of Elemental Blade (411). (Source: Shadow World Master Atlas 3rd Edition (2001); Chapter 5.4: Magical Materials & Alloys, page 58) The ease of imbedding property is not specific to elemental spells. It is a very expensive magical alloy of gold, silver, and iron. 10,000 silver/ounce.
I.C.E. Age: The drake falchion is one of the oldest item drops in the treasure system. It is unclear when exactly feras items first existed as crumbly electric flares instead of flames, and it is unclear to what extent the non-crumbly elrodnite existed in the I.C.E. Age. While the elemental metal name and basic concept came from the Elemental Companion (1989), its material property is idiosyncratic to GemStone. In the Elemental Companion (1989), page 10, elemental ice can have a cooling or hardening effect, but can also provide a defensive effect as with the elemental metal. Ice inflicts impact and cold criticals.

Eog

Modern: Ora

Common Eog is an extremely hard but brittle metal that is incredibly rare, and only becomes used for weapons and armor in alloy forms. It is a dull silvery-grey in appearance, but comes in other forms, including blue and red. White and black eog are somewhat anti-magical in that that they locally inhibit the flows of essence. When used in combination they would act similar to kregora, though not to the same severity and without power draining. (Including significant amounts of arinyark would come closer.) Eog is more powerful and rare in Rolemaster and Shadow World than ora is in GemStone.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +30
Resistance: +30
ST/BF: +15/+30
Cost Multiplier: 10,000x
RM Value: 2,000 gold/ounce
SW Value: 2,000 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: Eog is described as an Elven magical alloy made from mithril, titanium ("durang" for "dark iron"), and other unknown materials. The color variations other than common grey are red, blue, white, and black, but Rolemaster does not specify any special properties for these varieties. Eog is unusual in that it has to be forged with intense cold like laen, but then further subjected to intense heat, such as with the essence of elementals. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1992); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 15) In the Treasure Companion (1996) eog is only described in its gray form as "true steel/iron." (Treasure Companion Chapter 3.5.3: Enchanted Substances, page 27) In the Elemental Companion (1989) eog is defined as an elemental metal that is an alloy of elemental earth material with elemental cold, making weapons of nullification, which nullifies and cancels the effects of spells cast at the wielder. (Source: The Elemental Companion (1989); Chapter 16.2.5 Elemental Weapon Properties, page 139). This property of eog is what is used in canon Shadow World.
Shadow World: Eog varieties are pure metals in Shadow World, but the weapons are always alloys because it is brittle. Black and white eog have anti-magical properties, unlike ordinary eog. Black eog is unholy in that it can inhibit or even nullify ordinary magic, as opposed to the Dark Essence realms where the power originates in sources such the Unlife or dark gods. In a room covered in 1 inch panels of black eog, most ordinary magic users would not be able to cast spells, but they would still have their power points (unlike kregora which actually drains them.) (Source: Shadow World Master Atlas, 3rd Edition (2001); Chapter 5.4: Magical Materials & Alloys, page 58) The same would be true in reverse for white eog and Dark Essence users, including unholy creatures such as the undead. Common Eog is also called Grey Eog.
I.C.E. Age: Black and white eog existed as metals in the I.C.E. Age. Their cursed and sanctified properties are specific to GemStone. Eog is not treated as an elemental or flaring metal, and eog was used much earlier for weapons in GemStone (1990) than the elemental flaring metals.

Fabrinine

Modern: Drakar

Fabrinine is allegedly a bonding weapon metal where all of the elements are perfectly in balance, and it binds with the soul of the first person to wield it. It dies with this wielder, but the bond provides protection from "death magic" and critical blows. The basic concept of becoming one with the wielder as a "living weapon" does come from the Elemental Companion (1989). Elemental Plasma on page 11 is defined as composed of exactly equal amounts of the basic elements.

Oddly enough, fabrinine is defined in canon as an elemental metal made as an alloy of elemental earth material with elemental plasma, and it reduces the severity of critical hits on its wielder. This is completely different from the nature of Drakar, and presumably these were not the properties fabrinine was given in GemStone.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: Unknown
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: Unknown
Cost Multiplier: Unknown
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: Fabrinine is allegedly the "metal of mortality" with all of the primary elements perfectly in balance, though this is from a syncretic list of multiple game systems. In the Elemental Companion (1989) it an alloy of elemental earth metal and elemental plasma, making "living weapons" that bond with wielder, which reduces the severity of the critical hits upon them. Mithril is actually the fire-earth alloy and the metal burns, igniting or melting other substances. (Source: The Elemental Companion (1989); Chapter 16.2.5 Elemental Weapon Properties, page 140). "Cotaentine" in contrast is the fire element corrupted metal with fire criticals in the Elemental Companion of 2002. (Source: Fire & Ice - The Elemental Companion (2002); Chapter 10.0: Elemental Item Enchant, page 101 & 105)
Shadow World: There do not appear to be any metals corresponding to the properties of "fabrinine" in the Shadow World source books. There is a metal called "electrium" which can be easily imbedded with elemental spells, creating something effectively equivalent to drakar and all of the others. However, this was not mentioned in early enough sources, and other materials can be imbedded. It would be like using Magic Item Creation (420) on a sword instead of Elemental Blade (411). (Source: Shadow World Master Atlas 3rd Edition (2001); Chapter 5.4: Magical Materials & Alloys, page 58) The ease of imbedding property is not specific to elemental spells. It is a very expensive magical alloy of gold, silver, and iron. 10,000 silver/ounce.
I.C.E. Age: The drake falchion is one of the oldest item drops in the treasure system, and they are not crumbly in the first place. It is unclear to what extent fabrinine existed in the I.C.E. Age, if it was effectively just a +5 version of drake weapons. The fire flare property is idiosyncratic to GemStone and previously existed on drake falchions. Catoetine is the elemental metal in Rolemaster that is made with elemental heat, and it does not have a fire flare property. Mithril is the fire-earth alloy in the Elemental Companion (1989), and literally burns, though this is not quite the same as flaring. Ironically, elemental plasma inflicts plasma, impact, and cold critials, not heat criticals. But it is +30 against combustibles.

Galvorn

Modern: Golvern

Galvorn is an alloy with unspecified color in Rolemaster made from "meteoric iron" and other substances known only to a few smithing guilds. It is extremely malleable but puncture and cut resistant. When forged with "specific elements" it becomes the hardest material known to exist. It is only worked in extremely hot forges. In the I.C.E. Middle Earth system its color is implied to be black, but in GemStone it is now defined to look gold or red-gold. Galvorn has a higher enchantment bonus in Rolemaster than golvern does in GemStone, where it is considered dwarven, but they are both extremely hard metals.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +40
Resistance: +40
ST/BF: +24/+99
Cost Multiplier: 90,000x
RM Value: 18,000 gold/ounce
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: In Rolemaster galvorn is an extremely rare alloy that is the hardest material known to exist when forged with the right elements. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1990); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 15) In the M.E.R.P. system it is called "Shining Black" with the same properties and is the rarest metal, with only two smiths possibly having rediscovered how to make it. (Source: Treasures of Middle Earth; Chapter 6.3: Metals, page 130) Breakage statistics are given in Character Law/Campaign Law, Chapter 7.3.6 (Catalog #1300).
Shadow World: It is not mentioned in the Shadow World Master Atlas, though an NPC item of galvorn exists in The Iron Wind source book (1983, page 42).
I.C.E. Age: Galvorn existed in the I.C.E. Age and had the highest breakage factor statistic with an ST/BF of +24/+99, identical to the modern ST/DU values of +24/+99. Golvern is implied to be a pure metal. There is no implied relationship with Dwaves in the I.C.E. sources.

High Steel

Modern: High steel

"High Steel" appeared on the late 1990s materials table with unspecified properties. In Rolemaster it is simply a carbon steel with a relatively high carbon content, but less carbon than white alloy and black alloy. In Shadow World non-magical "high steel" has a +10 bonus from its hardness and ability to hold an edge compared to iron. In the modern lore "high steel" is an extremely rare alloy dating back to the Ur-Daemon War with a +30 enchant, extraplanar bane, and intrinsic critical weighting or padding with those creatures. It was first introduced in Ebon Gate of 5117 Modern Era.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +10
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: +10/+30
Cost Multiplier: 50x
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: In the Treasure Companion the cost multiplier for high steel is 50x with a bonus of +10 and a strength bonus of +10 (page 38.) It provides a points system for the level of carbon in a steel. Low steel is 50 to 60 points, high steel is 60 to 70 points, white alloy is 70+ points, and black alloy is 100+ points. (Source: Treasure Companion Chapter 3.4.2: Carbon Steel; pages 26, 38)
Shadow World: "High steel" is a non-magical alloy of iron, carbon, and other materials with a bonus of +10 and a BF of +30. (Source: Shadow World Master Atlast 3rd Ed. (2001); Chapter 5.4: Special Weapon Alloys, page 57)
I.C.E. Age: It is unclear to what extent "high steel" existed in the I.C.E. Age. Its properties were left undefined on the late 1990s materials table. The I.C.E. Age of GemStone III ended prior to the publication of Treasure Companion and the Third Edition of the Shadow World Master Atlas. The term was reintroduced as an extremely rare Level 100 metal in 2017, with extraplanar properties bearing no resemblance to the I.C.E. material versions.

Inniculmoid

Modern: Gornar

While gornar shakes uncontrollably creating the risk of inflicting an impact critical, inniculmoid is allegedly an elemental metal that both generates and harmlessly absorbs tremendous "concussion blasts." It is the "metal of force" and hard to make because there are no "spirits of force." In the Elemental Companion (1989) it is made from elemental earth metal alloyed with elemental inertia, and has the effect of throwing back the target some number of feet. In contrast Davistone is the earth-earth alloy, useful for smashing holes through barriers, and raysorite is the vibration-earth alloy but are singing weapons that increase the offensive bonus of those who can hear them.

Gornar is instead a pure metal. Gornar is notably rumored to be the remnants of a powerful earth elemental. Inniculmoid is supposedly primarily used to make tools such as hammers and anvils, though a few shields supposedly exist, and it is wasted on swords. This implies it is an absorber unlike gornar. But this comes from that syncretic list and not the Elemental Companion.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: Unknown
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: Unknown
Cost Multiplier: Unknown
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: Inniculmoid is mentioned in a syncretic list of multiple game systems. In the Elemental Companion (1989) it is defined similarly as the "metal of force", made as an alloy of elemental inertia and elemental earth. Earth-earth is instead Davistone, which smashes barriers, and vibration is instead song related in raysorite. (Source: The Elemental Companion (1989); Chapter 16.2.5 Elemental Weapon Properties, page 140). In the Elemental Companion of 2002 the earth element corrupted metal is "Davistone", a silvery metal very similar in appearance to mithril, which inflicts crushing criticals through gravitational forces. (Source: Fire & Ice - The Elemental Companion (2002); Chapter 10.0: Elemental Item Enchant, page 101 & 103) In contrast, the syncretic list has Davistone as an elemental metal, but with the power of breaking through barriers. Weapons will sunder armor and wall spells, armor will allow you to walk through.
Shadow World: There do not appear to be any metals corresponding to the properties of "inniculmoid" in the Shadow World source books. There is a metal called "electrium" which can be easily imbedded with elemental spells, creating something effectively equivalent to gornar and all of the others. However, this was not mentioned in early enough sources, and other materials can be imbedded. It would be like using Magic Item Creation (420) on a sword instead of Elemental Blade (411). (Source: Shadow World Master Atlas 3rd Edition (2001); Chapter 5.4: Magical Materials & Alloys, page 58) The ease of imbedding property is not specific to elemental spells. It is a very expensive magical alloy of gold, silver, and iron. 10,000 silver/ounce.
I.C.E. Age: The drake falchion is one of the oldest item drops in the treasure system. It is unclear when exactly feras items first existed as crumbly electric flares instead of flames, and it is unclear to what extent the non-crumbly inniculmoid existed in the I.C.E. Age. The impact criticals are perhaps more consistent with Davistone than Inniculmoid. These are not defined as flaring weapons in the Elemental Companion. That is idiosyncratic to GemStone. Elemental inertia does impact and shock criticals, on page 9, and is actually +30 against vibration creatues.

Iorake

Modern: Eonake

Iorake was named after the Shadow World deity Iorak, who is the Eonak of modern GemStone religion. It is a unique metal to the game that does not exist in the Shadow World source books, nor does it exist in more general Rolemaster books. It is inherently sanctified in weapon form. It is quite strong and difficult to break while being lighter than steel. It is unclear if it was a Dwarven metal.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +20
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: +20/+55
Cost Multiplier: Unknown
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: Iorake does not exist in the Rolemaster source books. It is based on a deity of the Shadow World setting, but was apparently invented for GemStone III. There does not seem to be anything with analogous properties. The importance of the undead is greatly exaggerated in GemStone for historical development reasons, so there is little need for an inherently holy metal, and arguably some sound world system reasons to be against it.
Shadow World: The metal is named after Iorak, the Lord of Orhan of artificing. It is not mentioned in the Shadow World source books. White eog (ora) itself is not mentioned as being holy for undead purposes, so there is no basis for iorake. Eonake happens to be white now, possibly consistent with prior use.
I.C.E. Age: Iorake weapons existed in the I.C.E. Age, they are holy and harm the undead. Some of these notably have descriptions of glowing, while the modern lore says it "holds a perfect shine when polished." There were custom iorake claidhmores made by the Hobbit merchant Effefavelopa.

Ithilnaur

Modern: Vaalorn

Ithilnaur is an Elven metal also known as "moon-fire", which is supposed to be incredibly hard and keeps a "superbly keen edge." It is an alloy of mithril, titanium, and other metals forged under extreme heat, with the appearance of pure silver. Weapons of Ithilnaur are refolded dozens of times, forming "extremely strong laminates." In the late 1990s materials table "vaalorn" had a bonus of only +18, but remained an Elven metal. In the modern documentation it was explicitly attributed to the Vaalor elves. It is no longer silver in color, and it is not an alloy. The Vaalor secret is in the ability to dye it.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +20
Resistance: +20
ST/BF:  ?
Cost Multiplier: 1,000x
RM Value: 200 gold/ounce
SW Value:  ?
Game Details
Rolemaster: The description of Ithilnaur above is from the Alchemy Companion, Chapter 2.2.7 page 16. In the Middle Earth setting it is also used by the Dwarves of Moria for armaments. (Source: Treasures of Middle Earth; Chapter 6.3: Metals, page 130)
Shadow World: Ithilnaur does not appear to be used the Shadow World setting.
I.C.E. Age: It is unclear to what extent Ithilnaur existed in the I.C.E. Age, though in anecdotal reports Guillaume is thought to have had a weapon of ithilnaur made for him. Its enchantment bonus is slightly weaker than it would be in Rolemaster, and its breakage factor is probably higher there than its modern ST/DU statistics given its original lore and alloy components.

Ithloss

Modern: Imflass

Ithloss is a light golden colored enchanted alloy that was made by the Lords of Essaence in the First Era of the Shadow World history. It is extremely lightweight and flexible, making superior armor. It would also add +20 again Elemental attack spells. In practice the metal was not worth much because the knowledge of how to work it is extinct. The only items made of ithloss should be ancient artifacts of the Essence Lords. In the late 1990s materials table its bonus was only +12, but was the lightest of the armament metals. In the modern documentation it is instead a pure metal that is silver in color.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus:  ?
Resistance:  ?
ST/BF: +20/+40
Cost Multiplier:  ?
RM Value:  ?
SW Value: 2,000 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: Ithloss appears to be unique to the Shadow World setting. It is not mentioned in the other Rolemaster source books, seemingly first appearing in the Shadow World Master Atlas. It is not mentioned as a metal in the Middle Earth treasures book.
Shadow World: The property of providing +20 against Elemental attacks appears to have been introduced in the Third Edition of the Master Atlas. Its primary value is providing strong but very lightweight armor. Xenium would be lighter in principle, but it is not supposed to be used that way. Armor of ithloss is supposed to have "almost unequalled" value because of its weight and flexibility properties combined with its rarity.
I.C.E. Age: The restriction on ithloss being a lost secret did not seem to apply in GemStone. There is an ithloss claidhmore that weighs only 7 lbs. It is much more common and unremarkable in GemStone than it would be in an ordinary Shadow World setting.

Keron

Modern: Kelyn

Keron is a "black alloy" that differs from actual "black alloy." It is a shiny metal that when polished looks like it is wet or oily, and it does not corrode and should be treated as enchanted. In Rolemaster its bonus of +10 is inferior to the +20 of "black alloy", while in Shadow World they both have +20, but black alloy has a breakage factor of +50 while the BF of keron is +200. In GemStone the bonus is +10, but on the late 1990s materials table it was listed as +15, and the metals documentation says it is +5. Its ST/DU is remarkably high like in Shadow World, and it is no longer an alloy. While "matte black" is a listed color form for it, it allows variations of "mottled red" and "dark green", and it cannot be dyed. The official documentation says it has the enchantment of mithril but this does not seem to be true in reality.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +10
Resistance: +10
ST/BF:  ?
Cost Multiplier: 300x
RM Value: 60 gold/ounce
SW Value: 200 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: In Rolemaster, Keron is a "black alloy" that is slightly inferior to "Black Alloy" proper, but it is not subject to corrosion. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1990); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 15-16)
Shadow World: Keron and Black Alloy have the same enchantment bonus, but keron has a significantly superior breakage factor. So-called "Black Alloy" (Krelin) is a non-magical alloy, while Keron is treated as being enchanted. (Source: Shadow World Master Atlas, 3rd Ed. (2001); Chapter 5.4: Special Weapon Alloys, page 57-58) The general description and the point that it should be treated as enchanted goes back to the first edition (1990), and is the same as the Rolemaster Alchemy Companion.
I.C.E. Age: Keron has the bonus of the Alchemy Companion, and there were keron items in the I.C.E. Age. The adjusted numbers in Shadow World where it has the same bonus as "black alloy" was not until after the I.C.E. Age of GemStone III.

Kregora

Modern: Krodera

Kregora is the most powerful of the anti-Essaence metals, such as white and black Eog which locally inhibit the flows of essence, providing an absurdly high warding bonus. It is an extremely rare alloy made from mithril, gold, uranium, and other materials. It is supposed to be useless for weapons because it is extremely ductile and malleable, but even a mesh or netting of kregora is enough to render powerful magical items dormant. Its magic suppression powers are equally effective across all realms, and it will drain the power points (mana) of those around it. Highly specialized, non-magical tools are required to work kregora, and it is golden in color. Krodera is instead colored silver with a +25 bonus (as opposed to the -10 penalty), is not an alloy (being found beneath craters), and used to make weapons but not armor (unless significantly diluted.) The official documentation says its natural bonus is only that of mithril. Its ST/DU is much higher than it would be in Rolemaster, where it is not durable at all.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: -10
Resistance: +500
ST/BF:  ?
Cost Multiplier: 100,000x
RM Value: 20,000 gold/ounce
SW Value: 20,000 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: Kregora is not useful for making weapons in the Rolemaster source books, it would be used defensively or for utility in its magic suppression and draining power. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1990); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 16) In the Treasures of Middle Earth book it asserts the metal is also useless for jewelry because oxidizes quickly into a yellow patina color (page 130). Its true function is in lining surfaces with wires, netting, or mesh to prevent spells from passing through them, possibly on armor like arinyark.
Shadow World: Kregora is essentially identical to the way it is described in Rolemaster, except it is also described as being golden colored. In the Master Atlas Addendum (1991) it says kregora should be treated as at least ten times more potent at inhibiting magic than eog and rularon, and that this is true for all realms of power. This involves making an Extraordinary Spell Failure roll from Spell Law. (p.81)
I.C.E. Age: Kregora effectively nullifies the existence of magic, whereas krodera nullifies but also reflects spells like light off a pond. While a pure krodera weapon will nullify spells cast at or from its wielder, pure krodera armor will turn the spell back inward on the caster. Kregora armor in contrast, and arguably more consistently with the world system, would prevent the spell from being cast at all. Krodera does not seem to drain mana. It is unclear how many kregora items existed in the game or their exact properties, though there was a sheath made that imprisoned the demon blade at one point. This was a legendary scimitar with a slayer demon embedded in it that fed on spirit. In some respects kregora more closely resembles kroderine than krodera, which is a very high level metal that was invented much later.

Laen

Modern: Mein / Glaes

Laen is an almost indestructible volcanic glass that is very rarely naturally colored. Its strength is attributed to its "long crystal lattice structure", which is paradoxical because glass by definition is a non-crystalline amorphous solid lacking long range periodicity. Regardless, laen has an inverted thermodynamic profile, becoming stronger and more rigid with heat. It is only softened by subjecting it to extreme cold temperatures using magical furnaces. This does not seem to be true of glaes, which also comes in other colors, including rainbow glaes. It is supposed to occur rarely in nature.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +25
Resistance: +30
ST/BF: +24/+65
Cost Multiplier: 5,000x
RM Value: 1,000 gold/ounce
SW Value: 1,000 - 10,000 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: It is the "smokey" variety of laen that is cold forged, where the other main variety is white laen. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1990); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 16) White laen instead can only be forged under extreme heat, but this variety cannot be tinted. White laen is the strongest, red laen is the hardest to forge because it is fire resistant, green laen is somewhat anti-magical resisting spell imbeds, blue laen resists cold, and silver laen is relatively easy to enchant. (Source: Creatures & Treasures II; Chapter 15.0, page 67) Laen is also known as "true glass", and presumably is brittle when hit hard enough. In the Elemental Companion (1989) it is treated as an elemental metal that is an alloy of elemental earth material and elemental cold, and has the effect of reflecting spells back at the caster, in contast to eog which nullifies or cancels spells cast at the wielder. (Source: The Elemental Companion (1989); Chapter 16.2.5 Elemental Weapon Properties, page 139).
Shadow World: Shadow World does not mention that it is only the smokey variety of laen that requires intense cold to become softened and malleable for forging. It is considered an enchanted glass in both Rolemaster and Shadow World.
I.C.E. Age: Teras Isle was built out of the older Uman Isle project, and one of the things preserved in it was the island had vast deposits of laen. While the mein golems of Darkstone Castle explode, the soul golems of Teras Isle are made of glaes, and mein/glaes are the same material. Laen Golems are not described with that property in the Construct Companion (p.47), instead getting augmented or immunity properties according to the laen color variety. The bonus of the material is only +15. Laen weapons exist.

Lore

Modern: Laje

Lore is a lockpick material that is seemingly unique to GemStone III. This might be similar to "dwarven steel" in the sense of possibly having been an adjective that was formalized into its own metal. There is no "Lore" material in Shadow World or Rolemaster. "Lore lockpicks" were sold in Larton's backroom, and were actually made out of mithril. They cost 3,000 silver at a minimum.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: Unknown
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: Unknown
Cost Multiplier: Unknown
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: There is no "Lore" material in the Rolemaster source books.
Shadow World: There is no "Lore" material in the Shadow World source books.
I.C.E. Age: In the very early history of the game there were lockpicks with adjectives of "crude", "common", "good", and "professional." In Larton's backroom there was something called a "lore lockpick", which at the time was the best available material for it. It was actually made of mithril, not its own kind of metal. Lore was apparently turned into its own metal name, but there is no obvious reason for it to have been changed to "laje".

Low Steel

Modern: Low steel

"Low Steel" appeared on the late 1990s materials table with unspecified properties. In Rolemaster it is simply a carbon steel with a relatively high carbon content, but less carbon than high steel, white alloy, and black alloy. In Shadow World non-magical "low steel" (or simply "steel") has a +5 bonus from its hardness and ability to hold an edge compared to iron. In the modern lore it was introduced as a corrupted form of re-worked high steel, where it loses its intrinsic extraplanar bane and weighting, but gains a novel kind of flare and other properties. It was introduced in Ebon Gate of 5117 Modern Era.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +5
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: +0/+0
Cost Multiplier: 10x
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: In the Treasure Companion the cost multiplier for low steel is 10x with a bonus of +5 (page 38.) It provides a points system for the level of carbon in a steel. Low steel is 50 to 60 points, high steel is 60 to 70 points, white alloy is 70+ points, and black alloy is 100+ points. (Source: Treasure Companion Chapter 3.4.2: Carbon Steel; pages 26, 38)
Shadow World: "Low steel" is simply "steel" in Shadow World. It is a non-magical alloy of iron and carbon with a bonus of +5. (Source: Shadow World Master Atlast 3rd Ed. (2001); Chapter 5.4: Special Weapon Alloys, page 57)
I.C.E. Age: It is unclear to what extent "low steel" existed in the I.C.E. Age. Its properties were left undefined on the late 1990s materials table. The I.C.E. Age of GemStone III ended prior to the publication of Treasure Companion and the Third Edition of the Shadow World Master Atlas. Low steel was implemented in 2017 as a Level 100 metal with a +30 enchant and special magical properties differing from that of high steel.

Lysaughton

Modern: Urnon

Lysaughton is allegedly a white colored chaos metal, though its colors and shape fluctuate chaotically. Supposedly no mortal knows how to "make" this metal, the "primary source" of it is some demon realm. This is presumably the lore basis behind making the name into Urnon, which is now treated as a pure metal found in this world. Forges for reworking bits of lysaughton supposedly are fueled with uncontrolled magic, broken wands and gemstones, and the dung of demons and shapeshifters. It is essentially the acid flare metal in GemStone, it is unclear if any more exotic properties existed.

In the Elemental Companion (1989) lysaughton is the "chaos weapons", being made as an alloy of elemental earth material with elemental chaos. This results in a weapon that is constantly changing shape, though always in the form of a weapon of the same basic type, with a chance of the wielder being able to control the shape of the weapon. There is no mention of an acid flare property. However, elemental chaos is defined on page 12 as inflicting acid criticals, so it is consistent.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: Unknown
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: Unknown
Cost Multiplier: Unknown
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: Lysaughton is allegedly a metal of chaos that is made primarily on some demonic plane of existence, according to a syncretic list of multiple game systems. This does not say anything about acid flares. "Neurolite" is allegedly supposed to be the strongly corrosive metal. In the Rolemaster canon of the Elemental Companion (1989), lysaughton is the elemental metal made from an alloy of elemental earth and elemental chaos, resulting in shape shifting weapons. (Source: The Elemental Companion (1989); Chapter 16.2.5 Elemental Weapon Properties, page 139). Elemental Chaos does inflict acid criticals according to page 12.
Shadow World: There is no "Lysaughton" material in the Shadow World source books.
I.C.E. Age: It is unclear to what extent lysaughton weapons existed in the I.C.E. Age. There was an interim word "lyshalvaon" before it was turned into "urnon". The properties of the metal are similarly unclear, though even old urnon weapons at the very least are acid flares. In the late 1990s materials table urnon was slated to be an extremely rare "chaos" metal with a +20 enchantment, and now urnon weapons typically have chaotically fluctuating bonuses. It was given a fairly high ST/DU when breakage was possibly returning prior to the GSIV conversion.

Mcgrail

Modern: Urglaes

Mcgrail is allegedly an utterly black metal that throws off shadows, where weapons of it will hide the wielder in darkness and armor allows you to vanish into the shadows and emerge from different shadows. Similar effects have been implemented modernly for pure black ora and ShadowDeath weapons, except the former inflicts wounds on those touching it and the latter thirsts for blood. Urglaes is inherently cursed and its powers will sometimes be directed back at the wielder. Pure black ora is also cursed and touching it will inflict damage on the wielder from shadows.

In the Elemental Companion (1989) mcgrail is made as an alloy of elemental earth material and elemental darkness, and it simply has the effect of increasing the defensive bonus of the wielder. Mcgrail in the syncretic list supposedly can only be forged from ore and well water that has never seen light, as well as the distilled essence of shadow creatures, and fire from things that are inherently black. This is much like the way thew bark trees are made modernly. Urglaes is supposed to be a pure metal. The idea of inflicting unexplained mutations on the body of the forger does not come from mcgrail. The relatively higher defensive bonus of the metal is still true of urglaes, but it is built into the AS/DS numbers rather being a defender weapon.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: Unknown
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: Unknown
Cost Multiplier: Unknown
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: Mcgrail is allegedly a metal of darkness according to a syncretic list from multiple game systems. In the Elemental Companion (1989) mcgrail is the elemental metal that is an alloy of elemental earth material with elemental darkness, and has the effect of increasing the defensive bonus of the wielder. (Source: The Elemental Companion (1989); Chapter 16.2.5 Elemental Weapon Properties, page 139) Oddly enough, "megrail" is treated instead as an ice element corrupted metal, inflicting ice flares. (Source: Fire & Ice - The Elemental Companion (2002); Chapter 10.0: Elemental Item Enchant, page 101 & 105) Since it was clustered with flaring metals in the game, it is unclear if mcgrail is supposed to inflict darkness flares. It is most likely the case that its relative DB enhancing ability is simply built into its metal statistics. Elemental Darkness in the Elemental Companion (1989), page 9, inflicts cold and depression criticals, is +30 against light creatures, and can hide objects without harming them as a special effect.
Shadow World: There is no "Mcgrail" material in the Shadow World source books.
I.C.E. Age: It is unclear to what extent mcgrail existed in the I.C.E. Age, and its interim name of urglaes was seemingly before laen itself was changed to glaes (possibly being mein rhymes with laen but glaes looks like glass.) Urglaes was included clustered together with the other flaring / elemental metals on the late 1990s materials table. Its strength is significantly weaker than glaes, and it is unclear if there is now supposed to be a relation between them. The fact that urglaes provides a stronger defensive bonus than its offensive enchant is possibly a vestige of the original mcgrail lore, with the implication that its darkness is primarily helpful for hiding the wielder. The special properties of urglaes do not seem to be stated, or how the stated ones differ from pure black ora. This is probably because the higher DS is the special property, grandfathered in from the I.C.E. origins.

Mithglin

Modern: Mithglin

Mithglin is an alloy of mithril, platinum, titanium, and other materials, sometimes gold to make it more workable. It is used for weapons and jewelry, "prized for its shining hue." It is forged with high temperatures and hard labor, which is still true in its modern documentation. In contrast, modernly it is an alloy of mithril and vultite (shaalk), intended to make an alloy with superior strength and durability to them. Its bonus is only +15 in GemStone whereas it is +20 in Rolemaster, and it is dark colored instead of silvery. In Rolemaster mithglin is significantly less valuable than pure mithril.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +20
Resistance: +10
ST/BF:  ?
Cost Multiplier: 375x
RM Value: 75 gold/ounce
SW Value:  ?
Game Details
Rolemaster: In the Middle Earth system mithglin is used to make more durable jewelry than gold or silver ("mal" and "celeb"), but is less prized than mithril itself. When mithglin is made using gold, the result is "white gold" made of the mithglin alloy constituents, being more corrosion resistant. (Source: Treasures of Middle Earth; Chapter 6.3: Metals, page 131) Mithril itself is a term borrowed from Tolkien and absorbed into Rolemaster. The description above is from the Alchemy Companion. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1990); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 16)
Shadow World: Mithglin and mithril do not seem to exist in the Shadow World setting.
I.C.E. Age: Mithglin is odd in that it has the same name and roughly the same properties as it does in the I.C.E. source books, appearing on the late 1990s materials table (as a weapon but not an armor metal) but not in the SHIFT verb. It is unclear if mithglin existed in the I.C.E. Age. The weight modifier for mithglin is 110% while mithril is only 90%. This is curious for the modern lore because vultite is actually 80%.

Mithril

Modern: Mithril

Mithril is a pure metal that is highly prized by Dwarves for its value in making unique enchanted alloys. It is malleable and silver-white, but unlike silver it does not tarnish. In the modern documentation it is a dull grey or has bluish hue, and is mostly a Dwarven metal, prized for weapon and armor due to being "extremely dense" (though its weight modifier is actually 90%). In contrast to Rolemaster its enchantment bonus is only +5 in GemStone, and it is treated as slightly anti-magical to the extent that mana cannot penetrate containers of mithril, though this is attributed to its "magical stability."

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +20
Resistance: +20
ST/BF: +20/+40
Cost Multiplier: 2,000x
RM Value: 400 gold/ounce
SW Value:  ?
Game Details
Rolemaster: In the Middle Earth system mithril is the most prized metal of the Dwarves, where the ones of Moria accidentally released the Balrog digging for it. It is called "true silver", and the source of many wondrous alloys. There is a single vein of mithril through Middle Earth. (Source: Treasures of Middle Earth; Chapter 6.3: Metals, page 131) Mithril itself is a term borrowed from Tolkien and absorbed into Rolemaster. The description above is from the Alchemy Companion. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1990); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 16). In the Elemental Companion (1989) it is treated as an elemental metal that is an alloy of elemental fire and elemental earth material, so that mithril weapons can burn with fire and will ignite or melt other objects. (Source: The Elemental Companion (1989); Chapter 16.2.5 Elemental Weapon Properties, page 139)
Shadow World: Mithglin and mithril do not seem to exist in the Shadow World setting. Interestingly, metals such as Eog and Kregora are described as being used in alloyed form, but the components where mithril would be named are suppressed.
I.C.E. Age: Mithril has the same name now as it did in the I.C.E. Age, as the word comes from Tolkien so did not need to be changed. It is a constituent metal of the alloys eog, ithilnaur, kregora, mithglin, and possibly "dwarven steel" and the elemental metals that are "cousins of eog." "Lore" was originally just mithril. Mithglin is more valuable than mithril in GemStone, but the other way around in I.C.E. sources. Ironically, fabrinine became drakar which is the fire flaring metal, but in the Elemental Companion (1989) mithril is the closest thing to a fire flaring weapon metal. Elemental Fire is defined on page 9 as +30 against combustibles, ice, and water creatures, does heat and radiation criticals, produces artificial light and burns things.

Neurolite

Modern: Razern

Neurolite is supposedly a metal that shreds other materials as though they had been exposed to strong acid, except there is no actual dissolving involved. The effect comes from the metal holding things in stasis, while the surrounding material moves around the parts that cannot be moved. It is very difficult to work neurolite without repeatedly destroying your tools. In effect this means the metal is inherently crit weighted. In the modern documentation for razern this is explained as being able to be folded a great many times without any need for more weighting or balancing, allowing extremely sharp edges on weapons and so all the better for cutting. In a different M.U.D. this was implemented as a limb severing "elemental damage", though "eonmite" is the actual metal of time, preventing aging or stealing youth.

In the Elemental Companion (1989) neurolite is the elemental metal that is the alloy of elemental earth material with elemental nether, which results in limb severing weapons. It imposes a percentage chance of severing the inflicted body part whenever a critical hit occurs. There is no reference in this to corrosion or strong acid. This is basically consistent with the natural crit weighting of razern, though razern is not defined in this way in the modern documentation. The reason this happens is that Elemental Nether is an extreme absorber, taking whatever is stuck into it and severing it up to that point.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: Unknown
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: Unknown
Cost Multiplier: Unknown
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: Neurolite allegedly is a paradoxical metal that is "black yet white, cold but hot." It is a metal that seemingly freezes time and causes "shredding" in the interaction of this local stasis with the surrounding material. This amounts to the material being unusually good at cutting through things. In spite of the "neuro" prefix there is nothing mental about it. This is from a syncretic list of material from multiple game systems. In the Elemental Companion (1989) neurolite is the elemental metal that is an alloy of elemental earth material with elemental nether, and it makes limb severer weapons, which impose a chance of severing the body part whenever a critical hit happens. This is similar in concept to crit weighting. (Source: The Elemental Companion (1989); Chapter 16.2.5 Elemental Weapon Properties, page 140)
Shadow World: Neurolite does not appear to exist in the Shadow World setting.
I.C.E. Age: It is unclear to what extent neurolite existed in the I.C.E. Age. Lysaughton is treated as the corrosive flaring weapon, because urnon has acid flares. Razern is lightly crit weighted as an inherently property of the material, though this is given a different explanation in the modern documentation. In the Elemental Companion (1989), page 13, Elemental Nether actually inflicts disruption and stress criticals, but it is primarily an exteme absorber that takes what goes to it and does not give back. Resulting in severing. Nether actually is the opposite of Chaos, which has acid criticals, and +30 against chaos creatures.

Rularon

Modern: Rolaren

Rularon is a very soft, malleable enchanted metal with a dull silver color. While this would make it useless for weapons and armor, its primary value is it is a powerful inhibitor of Mentalism spells. Full helms plated with Rularon have the ability to completely protect the wearer from mentalism, as well as prevent their ability to cast it. It is unclear if it is an alloy. In contrast, rolaren is an extremely strong and durable deep blue-grey to black alloy, made primarily out of mithril with trace elements and used for weapons and armor. The color change is consistent with the changes for mithril and mithglin.

When the modern documentation for metals was released the mentalism inhibition property was removed, though this was before the introduction of the Mental sphere in the GemStone IV conversion. In some older locations rolaren would still implicitly be invoking symbolic meaning of its mind suppression powers, such as the chests in Castle Anwyn or the chain prison in The Rift.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: -10
Resistance: +20
ST/BF: +20/+65
Cost Multiplier: 5,000x
RM Value: 1,000 gold/ounce
SW Value: 1,000 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: Rularon does not require any special forging, it is a very soft and malleable metal. The documentation does not say if it is a pure metal or an alloy, though Shadow World explicitly refers to it as enchanted. Items would be plated with it, not constructed from it. In this sense it is similar to other very expensive magic property augmenting materials such as arinyark and kregora which do not need to be bulk.
Shadow World: Rularon is described the same way in Shadow World as it is in Rolemaster. It adds that it cuts off the wearer from "mental contact", so telepathy or psionics would not work as well. Mentalism is different from these because it is spellcraft. The Master Atlas Addendum (1991) asserts that the placement of the rularon is relevant to inhibiting a spell targeting that spot. It also says that kregora should be treated as at least ten times more potent at blocking mentalism as an equivalent amount of rularon, but it is more than 10x more expensive. (p.81)
I.C.E. Age: Rularon existed in the I.C.E. Age but there was never actually an implemented Mental realm of power. Mind oriented spells were scattered across multiple spell lists, though this is partly justified by the realm overlap redundancies in Rolemaster. Its enchant bonus in GemStone is +20 while it is -10 in Rolemaster. Rolaren was supposed to have significantly superior breakage statistics compared to vultite, but at the moment is not more useful in any way. It has the drawback of being heavier than vultite, though it is lighter and stronger than mithglin.

Shaalk

Modern: Vultite

Shaalk is supposed to be an "extremely light and flexible" enchanted material, pliable and "perfectly resilient." It is not a "true metal" but also not a glass, so its material composition is somewhat mysterious. Its utility is supposed to be many-fold, but it is normally not used for weapons (though it is said to make exquisite bows.) It has a +20 bonus that only applies in certain situations such as lockpicking.

In the Shadow World setting it is asserted that very thin slices of shaalk look like finest white paper except glossier, and that it will only melt under extreme heat but not ordinary fires. For this reason the most important manuscripts of the Lords of Essaence were written with shaalk. In the modern documentation vultite is naturally a light blue-grey, and is quite stong and durable while being lightweight, extremely commonly used for making weapons and armor. Vultite might have been derived from the Iruaric "vul" meaning "enchanted." Vult was also the original name of the Great Spirit Voln.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +20
Resistance: +10
ST/BF: +15/+40
Cost Multiplier: 500x
RM Value: 100 gold/ounce
SW Value: 100 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: Shaalk is not normally used for weapons, and it's +20 bonus only applies in some situations. In this setting it is asserted that shaalk is neither a "true metal" nor is it a glass. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1990); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 16)
Shadow World: In the first edition of the Shadow World Master Atlas (1989, page 13) it is asserted that the Lords of Essaence made "tomes" out of shaalk so they would not decay with time or be destroyed. It does say here that "protective garments" and "lightweight armor" can be made from shaalk, and that language is not removed until the 3rd Edition (2001, page 58) and still in 4th Edition (2004, page 230). In the 2nd Edition (1992, page 18) the wording is changed so it is the Loremasters who make tomes with Shaalk pages rather than the Lords of Essaence.
I.C.E. Age: The manuscript of Kadaena in The Graveyard was made out of shaalk because she was the Empress of the Lords of Essaence and that implies its authenticity. While shaalk is not supposed to be used for weapons, it has a context independent +20 enchantment bonus in GemStone and is extremely common as a weapon material. It is still lightweight for a metal, though it is explicitly a (pure) metal now.

Star Iron

Modern: Veil iron

Star iron is an extremely rare alloy forged from metals collected from certain meteorites. It is always a dark, dull grey in appearance. Star iron is inherently anti-magical, but is believed to have other more arcane powers, though their nature is uncertain. In the Shadow World setting the formula for making star iron has been lost since the First Era, so the only items made of it should be Lord of Essaence relics. The Shadowstone of the Empress Kadaena, for example, was set within star iron. It cannot be worked by any known means, so there are few interested buyers of the raw metal.

Veil iron in its most pure form has the power of draining the magical power of items in its vicinity. This was symbolically represented by an Ur-Daemon obelisk found in the ora mines of Rhoska-Tor, and possibly an orb of "pure veil iron" and krodera found in the ancient monolith on Melgorehn's Reach. This was discovered in recent years, "pure star iron" would have been meaningless. Veil iron is now a pure metal found in meteorites, black or charcoal grey with specks or steaks of white or blue, and there is no premise of being unable to work it. Instead of being associated with a powerful race from 100,000+ years ago as star iron is with the Lords of Essaence, it is described as one of the first metals ever found by primitive tribes, with veil-iron spearheads older than the Ur-Daemon War.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +45
Resistance: +300
ST/BF: +24/+75
Cost Multiplier: 25,000x
RM Value: 5,000 gold/ounce
SW Value: 5,000 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: In Rolemaster it is thought that only a few Alchemist Guilds know the mysterious other properties of star iron. This language is dropped in the Shadow World setting, where it is all long dead knowledge. It is also called "Angil" in Rolemaster, and there is no premise of no longer being able to forge it. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1990); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 16)
Shadow World: Star Iron is first defined, along with the inability to make star iron since First Era of the Shadow World history, in the Shadow World Master Atlas Addendum (1991) Part XI: Magical Materials (page 81).
I.C.E. Age: The Rolemaster enchantment bonus for Star Iron is +45, but it is only +25 in GemStone. However, it has an absurdly high warding resistance of +300, which does not exist in this game for veil iron. This is presumably due to its "anti-magical" nature, kregora being the only similar example and stronger. Veil iron by its inherent nature cannot be enchanted or ensorcelled. In the late 1990s materials table it is described as "magic resist", and in the modern lore has the property of draining the magical energy of its surroundings. This was a property of kregora which does not hold for krodera. It has the highest breakage statistics other than galvorn / golvern.

Vaanum

Modern: Vaalin

Vaanum is an extremely rare silver-white metal that is thought to only exist on Charon (Lornon), and as such most alchemists and smiths will refuse to work on it. This was still the most recent lore for the metal at the time the Sheruvian Monastery was designed, which explains why there is so much vaalin in it, and why vaalin lockpicks were the highest end. Vaanum had the unique property of being "Of Slaying" on any living creature whenever there was a critical hit, which on a man sized creature allows a second critical hit and large or huge creatures have a slaying column on their critical tables.

In the modern documentation vaalin is strictly a lockpick material, being far too soft to be useful for weapons or armor. The color is still white and it forms in orbs, but has rainbow patterns when light hits it. It is found in caverns on this world and has no association with Lornon. Vaalin was left off the late 1990s materials table for some reason, but was part of the SHIFT verb earlier. In the modern lore it seems vaalin is a pure metal. Vaanum weapons of the Dark Lords in Shadow World are called "alloys", but there is presumably (though not necessarily) a Charon specific metal as the base of it.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +30
Resistance: +50
ST/BF:  ?
Cost Multiplier: 50,000x
RM Value:  ?
SW Value: 10,000 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: Vaanum does not seem to exist in the Rolemaster source books.
Shadow World: Vaanum is first defined in the Shadow World Master Atlas Addendum (1991), pages 79 to 81. Its properties stay the same in the 3rd edition (page 58) and 4th edition (page 231). Its strange lethal properties are believed to somehow be based on its origins on the moon of the Dark Gods. The Master Atlas Addendum (1st Edition) uses the conversion of 10 silver per 1 gold, instead of 20 silver to 1 gold.
I.C.E. Age: There is a chart in the Shadow World Master Atlas Addendum giving the bonus, RR resistance, and cost multipliers for "unusual materials." Vaanum was originally primarily a weapons metal because of its deadliness, whereas now it is strictly a lockpick metal. It is unclear if vaanum weapons existed in GemStone in the past. It was originally the rarest pure metal, and second only to kregora overall.

White Alloy

Modern: White alloy

It is an alloy of iron, titanium, carbon, and zinc. It is white in color, and does not require special forging equipment. While it is not all that uncommon in Rolemaster, it is extremely rare in modern GemStone IV. It was included along with black alloy on a late 1990s table before the modern metals lore was written, along with the lower carbon low and high steel, but its properties were left undefined. White alloy was released as a new weapon metal type at the May 2020 high end silver auction. It is similar to damage weighted undead bane but only for non-corporeal undead, allowing them to then take critical hits.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +15
Resistance: +5
ST/BF:  ?
Cost Multiplier: 100x
RM Value: 20 gold/ounce
SW Value: ?
Game Details
Rolemaster: As described above. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1992); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 15) In the Treasure Companion (1996) it asserts that "white alloys" are "hard" and difficult to forge because of their very high carbon content, and that they contain manganese and tungsten. (Treasure Companion Chapter 3.4.2: Carbon Steel; pages 26, 38) It is a non-magical carbon steel alloy.
Shadow World: It is called "Tethium" after its creator, the famous Iylari artificer Tethior, the brother of the weapon smith Krelij who invented black alloy and the dragonhelms with the Dragonlord Oran Jatar. It is a non-magical alloy of iron, carbon, and other materials. Pale grey. +50 BF ("breakage factor"). (Source: Shadow World Master Atlas, 3rd Edition (2001); Chapter 5.4: Special Weapon Alloys, page 57)
I.C.E. Age: The I.C.E. Age of GemStone III ended prior to the publication of Treasure Companion and the Third Edition of the Shadow World Master Atlas.

White Eog

Modern: White ora

White eog is an anti-magical metal that inhibits dark magic in the same way black eog does for light magic. Mechanically, most if not all player spells in GemStone III were technically "light" magic (even if they were violent) in that they used what we call "mana", so this anti-magical property is significantly weaker in the game than in Shadow World. Modernly, white ora is sanctified in the hands of a cleric or paladin, becoming able to inflict damage on the undead. In Shadow World the price per ingot of white and black ora is the same, they are exceptionally rare. In the modern metals lore black ora is much more rare than white ora and they are both pure forms. While it is not inconsistent for white eog to disrupt the undead or unholy things, this is not a defined property for it in the I.C.E. source materials.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: +30
Resistance: +30
ST/BF: +15/+30?
Cost Multiplier: 15,000x
RM Value: 2,000? gold/ounce
SW Value: 5,000 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: White eog is only mentioned as a color variation of normal dully silver-grey eog, which is described as an Elven magical alloy made from mithril, titanium ("durang"), and other unknown materials. It is not described as having special properties of its own as a color variation. (Source: Alchemy Companion (1992); Chapter 2.2.7: Enchanted Materials, page 15) In the Treasure Companion (1996) eog is only described in its gray form as "true steel" or "true iron." (Treasure Companion Chapter 3.5.3: Enchanted Substances, page 27)
Shadow World: Eog varieties are pure metals in Shadow World, but the weapons are always alloys because it is brittle. Black and white eog have anti-magical properties, unlike ordinary eog. Black eog is unholy in that it can inhibit or even nullify ordinary magic, as opposed to the Dark Essence realms where the power originates in sources such the Unlife or dark gods. In a room covered in 1 inch panels of white eog, most dark magic users would not be able to cast spells, but they would still have their power points (unlike kregora which actually drains them.) (Source: Shadow World Master Atlas, 3rd Edition (2001); Chapter 5.4: Magical Materials & Alloys, page 58) The Atlas Addendum (1991) says realm specific inhibitors like white eog should add at least +100 RR, and kregora is at least 10x more potent. (p.79)
I.C.E. Age: White eog is a sanctified metal which uses the game's undeath mechanics. White ora is naturally sanctified in the hands of a cleric, while black ora is naturally cursed. These properties are not mentioned in Shadow World. In general the Eog variants in Rolemaster and Shadow World are more powerful and valuable than the Ora that exists in GemStone.

Xenium

Modern: Veniom

Xenium is a blue-silver hued alloy of arinyark, titanium, and other more dangerous substances. Its constituent materials together nullify the force of gravity, allowing objects plated with xenium to float. Skyships are coated with xenium on their undersides, and most fabulously, the city of Eidolon itself in Sel-Kai of northern Emer floats in the air from the use of xenium. In the modern documentation veniom is a pure metal rather than an exotic alloy. The lightening property of veniom depends on the purity of the metal, whereas xenium might be unwieldy as a weapon, and as armor would float you away.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus:  ?
Resistance:  ?
ST/BF:  ?
Cost Multiplier:  ?
RM Value:  ?
SW Value: 1,000 silver/ounce
Game Details
Rolemaster: "Xenim" is listed as an earth material in a table on page 138 of the Elemental Companion (1989).
Shadow World: The listed price of xenium is the street price per ingot. It would be considerably less expensive when alchemists produce it in bulk to construct skyships or float the city of Eidolon in the air. (Source: Shadow World Master Atlas 3rd Ed. (2001); Chapter 5.4: Magical Materials & Alloys, page 58)
I.C.E. Age: Xenium weapons are not supposed to exist but they have historically in the game. In the distant past there were plans to implement Eidolon as a city traveled to by skyship, but instead the Uman Isle project was revived and turned into Teras Isle, discovered by dwarves crashing a hot air balloon. Most recently the floating city conceept has been reintroduced with Reim, though without any premise of its functioning via veniom plating. Veniom is a soft metal but has no ST/DU penalties, so in principle weapons and armors can be constructed from it.

Xeno

Modern: Alum

Xeno was a category of lockpick like "common", "good", or "professional." It was introduced as a quality step beyond the lore and laen lockpicks. In the modern documentation alum is very brittle and useless for weapons and armors, and comes in the natural form of spheres. The "softness" rationale used for lockpick metals is dubious given, for example, the high quality of glaes and golvern.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: Unknown
Resistance: Unknown
ST/BF: Unknown
Cost Multiplier: Unknown
RM Value: Unknown
SW Value: Unknown
Game Details
Rolemaster: Xeno is not a material in the Rolemaster source books.
Shadow World: Xeno is not a material in the Shadow World source books.
I.C.E. Age: Xeno was probably supposed to be some other material, and was apparently formalized as its own metal later. It was likely sold in the back of Larton's shop. Where lore and laen (now laje and glaes) had lockpick modifiers of 1.9 (now 1.75 and 1.6), xeno lockpicks were superior with a factor of 2.5. Vaalin is now the highest modifier with 2.5, and alum is only 2.3.

Woods

While the SHIFT verb includes woods from the Shadow World source books, most of them do not appear in room descriptions from that whole period. With the exception of windak (modwir) they also never appear once in the Kelfour Edition newsletters up through 1993. There is an implied presence of Lunarni trees in the Upper Kaldsfang, but the word does not appear in existing room painting. It is implied by making use of the specific detail of 500 foot trees. Lunarni are the trees that make up the Blue Forest, which in the Jaiman (1989) soure book is stated to reach all the way to Claedesbrim Bay.

Lunarni have silvery-blue bark and blue-green needles, and mean "Blue Spires", where Lu'nak is the Blue Forest. The Black Forest of Dir is supposed to be adjacent to northwest Lu'nak, though sources inconsistently place it north or south of the High Plateau. The Shards of that forest are potentially consistent with the Dead Woods area near Smatoth (Sentoph), which dates to 1990, and were huntable outside the Spider Temple at one point. The hidden elven settlement next to the "Red Forest" was not released until roughly February 1996, which was several months after the I.C.E. split.

Dir

Modern: Fel

Dir is a black hardwood similar to ebony, used to make superior staves and bows, and the tree also has black bark. It is a tall deciduous tree with a vertical trunk and short branches, with round leaves, which are dark underneath and silvery green on top. The seed pod is disc shaped and edged to be aerodynamic. There seems to be no mention of Dir wood in the Kelfour Editions, though it is used in rooms from 1993 and 1994. Dir-hafted weapons were not sold in the I.C.E. Age. There were dir-hafted weapons sold on the Juggernaut in 1996, after the De-I.C.E., but dir-hafted weapons were a brief mistake.

Fel was consistently defined in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) as a hardwood that is almost as dark as ebony. The tree itself instead "broad" with long leaves consisting of over a dozen opposing leaflets. Fel has deep black nuts as fruit instead of the Dir seed pods. Fel trees are defined as only being found in the Landing region in the modern flora documentation. They exist in post-I.C.E. rooms around Thanatoph.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: N/A
Resistance: N/A
ST/BF: N/A
Cost Multiplier: N/A
RM Value: N/A
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: The woods used in GemStone are probably unique to the Shadow World setting and not the Rolemaster books.
Shadow World: While the description of the wood is given in the Emer (1990) source book, page 11, the Shadow World Master Atlas Addendum (1990), page 34, first defined the Shards of Ugus Fost as residing in the great northwestern forest of Dir, whereas the Shadow World Master Atlas: World Guide (1989), page 21, implied they were in the Lu'nak (Blue Forest). This excerpt was quoted entirely as article #1062 in the Tomes of Kulthea, the I.C.E. Age lore documentation library. These were used by the Priests Arnak to destroy his kingdom, which the Addendum (1990) refers to as "NW Jaiman" on page 14 and page 12 of Jaiman (1989). The Shards are implicitly referenced in an Andraax poem about Kadaena on page 3 of Jaiman (1989), and referred to indirectly as "demonic" on page 12, but the words "Shards" and "Dir" are not used in Jaiman (1989). The word Dir is not used in the Master Atlas: World Guide (1989) or the Master Atlas: Inhabitants Guide (1989). Ugus Fost dates back to The Iron Wind (1983), but Dir does not. The word seems to first exist in Shadow World books published in 1990. In Shadow World Master Atlas, 3rd Edition (2001), page 69, Dir staves are +5 and bows are +20. This page also includes an illustration of Dir leaves. While there are opposing side leaves, it only shows five branching off a stem, the sides being slightly offset.
I.C.E. Age: The Dead Woods area near Smatoth (Sentoph) could be related to the Shards, since it was made in 1990, and is located somewhat near the room implicitly referring to Lunarni trees which were defined in the Jaiman (1989) book on page 4. However, this is a stretch, and does not include Shard thrones. Shards were considered "demonic" (made from men and demons), including a local mannish population called the Fustir, and notably black stalkers (dark shamblers) are demon possessed assassins in Rolemaster. One of the original rooms of the Broken Lands from 1993 has a "felwood" table that would have said "dirwood" originally. There are fel trees around Ronan's shrine, which would have said dir trees originally, which is from 1994. The forest of Dir is an obscure, buried detail. It is possible GM Kygar included it as "dirwood" in the Broken Lands from seeing the (regionally local) forest of Dir in the Shards entry for Kadaena's artificial constructs. But more generally, Dir as a wood probably came from the Emer (1990) source book.

Hoen

Modern: Haon

Hoen is a rare deciduous tree that resembles oak, with a naturally pale colored wood that is very valuable, an makes excellent bows. It has three-lobed leaves which have a light golden color, and its bark is lighter in color than the silver birch. It fluorishes when tended by the Elves. As such it is found mostly in Elven lands in Emer. Later source books elaborate that they are also present in Urulan, which is in eastern Jaiman, and the lowlands of the continent Palias. This was not until after the I.C.E. Age of GemStone III, so Hoen most likely would have been considered a foreign import from Emer.

Haon in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) was defined as having smoky grey bark that "almost glows" and "almost luminous" translucent leaves. This is loosely consistent with the general look of Hoen, but this may be coincidental. Haon nuts are rumored to have healing properties, but there is no analog for Hoen. Haon is not defined as being especially Elven, and haon trees are only found around River's Rest.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: N/A
Resistance: N/A
ST/BF: N/A
Cost Multiplier: N/A
RM Value: N/A
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: The woods used in GemStone are probably unique to the Shadow World setting and not the Rolemaster books.
Shadow World: Hoen trees are not defined in the Shadow World Master Atlas (1989) or the Jaiman (1989) source books. They seem to first appear in the Emer (1990) book on page 11 as a light contrast to Dir. Their presence in Jaiman and Palias is defined in Shadow World Master Atlas, 3rd Edition (2001), on page 69.
I.C.E. Age: Hoen does not appear in the Kelfour Edition newsletters. There do not seem to be any Hoen trees or objects in I.C.E. Age rooms. The material probably came from the Emer (1990) source book.

Miran

Modern: Monir

Miran trees are similar to maple trees, except they have lighter, smooth bark. They have dark green leaves that turn deep gold in the fall, unlike Hoen trees, whose leaves are always light gold. Miran and Hoen are both Elven woods. Miran was originally only found in Urulan, a former Elven kingdom in eastern Jaiman, and its seeds were brought elsewhere early in the Third Era of the Shadow World history. Miran seeds are similar to walnut-sized acorns. They are dark brown with a golden cap, and eating only a few them are filling for an entire day. Miran was De-I.C.E.'d as Monir in the SHIFT verb, but inconsistently defined as Varin in the Elanthian Herald conversion list, though there seem to be no cases of this being done in the game itself. This is anomalous as Varin itself was the second largest moon in the I.C.E. Age and was eliminated or otherwise misplaced in the De-I.C.E., though some have suggested the celestial body that fell in 1995 and caused the brief literal ice age effect in the game was Varin.

Regardless, Monir is defined as a genus in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002), which cites the shingle monir and the white monir as being Wehnimer's Landing region trees used by the northern Baronies. The shingle monir is used for making shingles, and the white monir is used for making ships and buildings. White monir also grows as a bush at high altitudes in the north. Monir is not an Elven wood and is common, while Miran was a rare wood. Its acorns are described as eaten by squirrels, and are sweeter if boiled or roasted. Their leaves turn red rather than gold in the fall.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: N/A
Resistance: N/A
ST/BF: N/A
Cost Multiplier: N/A
RM Value: N/A
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: The woods used in GemStone are probably unique to the Shadow World setting and not the Rolemaster books.
Shadow World: Miran is defined identically in Jaiman (1989), page 4, and Emer (1990) on page 11. In the Shadow World Master Atlas, 3rd Edition (2001), it specifies they are rarely seen outside Elven lands, and in northeast Emer are only found in Namar-Tol.
I.C.E. Age: Miran does not appear in the Kelfour Edition newsletters. There do not seem to be any I.C.E. Age period rooms that use it. It would have been considered an imported rare Elven wood. It was De-I.C.E.'d as "monir" for the SHIFT verb, but the Elanthian Herald glossary had it as "varin". There do not seem to be cases of the "varin" usage existing in the game itself. This would have been strange as Varin itself is a Shadow World term, though it would not be unprecedented, as "Onar" (the dark god was originally Omir) for example is actually a region in the continent of Emer.

Navaal

Modern: Maoral

Navaal is a "huge" reddish tropical conifer that grows wild in the jungles of Emer. It is a major undertaking to harvest navaal trees. It is similar to mahogany and has a striking grain pattern. The modern lore for maoral is remarkably consistent with this, as it is a reddish tropical tree, "the only truly deciduous conifer." The Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) places it in Teras Isle, Solhaven, and River's Rest.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: N/A
Resistance: N/A
ST/BF: N/A
Cost Multiplier: N/A
RM Value: N/A
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: The woods used in GemStone are probably unique to the Shadow World setting and not the Rolemaster books.
Shadow World: Navaal does not appear in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989), or the Jaiman (1989) source book. It is first defined on page 11 of the Emer (1990) source book. It is specified as a rare wood in the 3rd Edition of the Master Atlas on page 69.
I.C.E. Age: Navaal does not appear in the Kelfour Edition newsletters. There do not seem to be any I.C.E. Age period rooms that use it. It would have been considered an imported rare tropical wood from Emer. The material probably came from the Emer (1990) source book.

Thokot

Modern: Thanot

Thokot is a shrub that thrives in spite of hostile environments. It has four inch thorns that grow all over it, which inflict a modest nerve poison, through a sticky fluid. Thokot shrubs were used by landowners to guard against trespassers. They have "small bluish leaves" and make bitter red berries. Thokot berries may not have been an implemented concept, but they are part of the modern lore for thanot. Thokot is found in both the continents Jaiman and Emer.

The modern lore for thanot is almost the same as the details of thokot. Sprigs of thanot are instead cited as hung over the main door of houses to ward off false enchantments. Thanot berries carry a pentagram shape instead of a round dimple opposite its stalk.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: N/A
Resistance: N/A
ST/BF: N/A
Cost Multiplier: N/A
RM Value: N/A
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: The woods used in GemStone are probably unique to the Shadow World setting and not the Rolemaster books.
Shadow World: Thokot is identically defined in the Jaiman (1989) source book on page 4 and the Emer (1990) source book on page 11.
I.C.E. Age: Thokot does not appear in the Kelfour Edition newsletters. There do not seem to be any I.C.E. Age period rooms that use it. Thokot is indigenous in Jaiman and would naturally be found in the region of Kelfour's Landing, but while hardy shrubs are defined as existing in the high altitutdes, thokot is not specifically mentioned in the Quellbourne (1989) source book. The modern lore for thanot is almost the same as the I.C.E. lore for thokot.

Tonak

Modern: Tanik

Tonak is a conifer almost exclusively from Mur Fostisyr, off the northwest coast of Jaiman across from Claedesbrim Bay. Tonak is the Ky'taari word for "tree", and was originally defined as a variety of pine. Its pulp is used for making exceptional paper. It has pale blue needles and heavy cones. This is a detail about tonak that was not defined yet in The Iron Wind (1983) book, which already included the Blue Forest as existing on the mainland of Jaiman. The Blue Forest was later defined as stretching across northern Jaiman, up to Claedesbrim Bay, and thus implicitly across the Kaldsfang mountains and Quellbourne.

Tanik is very similar to the archaic lore for Tonak. Instead of the Blue Forest and having originally come from Mur Fostisyr, the blue tanik is originally from "the legendary Great Forest", which is left undefined. There are "great unexplored southern forests", according to Elanthian Flora Guide:Trees (2002), which only makes sense if it is a southern continent. Tanik is used to make parchment of unequaled quality.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: N/A
Resistance: N/A
ST/BF: N/A
Cost Multiplier: N/A
RM Value: N/A
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: The woods used in GemStone are probably unique to the Shadow World setting and not the Rolemaster books.
Shadow World: Tonak first appears in The Iron Wind (1983), page 7, and its lore is mostly unchanged in the Shadow World setting books of 1989 and onward. However, on page 15 of The Iron Wind (1983), it specifies that paper is made from the bark. Tonak is classified as a rare wood in the 3rd edition of the Master Atlas (2001) on page 69. Tonak is defined on page 4 of the Jaiman (1989) source book.
I.C.E. Age: Tonak does not appear in the Kelfour Edition newsletters. There do not seem to be any I.C.E. Age period rooms that use it. Tonak would be regarded as an import from Mur Fostisyr, which is a natural destination from the port of Kelfour's Landing. Torkaans (roltons) originated in Mur Fostisyr as well. Tonak most likely came from the Jaiman (1989) source book.

Windak

Modern: Modwir

Windak is a coastal pine and timberwood indigenous to the Quellbourne region, and grows abundantly on the lower slopes of the Kaldsfang mountains. It is tall and straight, and easily worked, but is not given much description as a tree other than being pine. It is used for making masts and hulls. Its use in ship building and having needles is retained in the modern lore for modwir.

Rolemaster Statistics
Bonus: N/A
Resistance: N/A
ST/BF: N/A
Cost Multiplier: N/A
RM Value: N/A
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: The woods used in GemStone are probably unique to the Shadow World setting and not the Rolemaster books.
Shadow World: Windak is specific to the Quellbourne region of Jaiman and appears on page 6 of the Quellbourne (1989) source book. It is not mentioned in the Jaiman (1989) book or the Master Atlas books. The exact geographical relationship of Quellbourne forests with the blue forest of Lu'nak is ill-defined.
I.C.E. Age: Windak was used in the earliest stories and locations of GemStone III. The prayer beads of Bandur Etrevion's theocracy, for example, were windak rosaries. Windak was also used in the Spider Temple, which was first built very early. It is the only one of these SHIFT verb woods that gets mentioned in the Kelfour Edition newsletters from 1990 through 1993. The Monastery with the monastic liches refers to the wood of a rare black modwir tree, which would have said windak originally. There is no definition for this outside this room. The forest of Dir was not overtly called the "black forest of Dir" yet in 1992, and the Emer (1990) book lore for Dir trees is inconsistent with pine trees, so this black windak probably is not intended to be related to the "dirwood" later released further into the Broken Lands. But it is not entirely impossible some relationship with the forest of Dir was intended.

Herbs

The herbs in the I.C.E. Age all come from Rolemaster books, Shadow World setting specific herbs were not implemented. In the GemStone III implementation during the I.C.E. Age, the herbs were represented in the game with capital letters. It would say "Akbutege Leaf" rather than "akbutege leaf", for example, which was the original name of acantha leaf. There are various vestigial examples along these lines, such as Cothinar flower, Imaera's Lace, and the parchment in the gardener's shack in Hearthstone Manor. Plants in general can often be seen to be capitalized in I.C.E. Age rooms. Various toxic plants also came from I.C.E. books, such as dirge-vaon which was creeping widow-wort, but often these did not get De-I.C.E.'d. They include Dreamdeath lichen, Dreamvine, salorisa, and Delphinuris.

While the lore for the woods is highly similar to their I.C.E. analogs, these more obscure plants were overlooked, or were otherwise retconned but retained their names. Herbs in contrast have little "lore" in the source books. The herb lore in Hearthstone Manor's garden shack were apparently adapted from Rolemaster climate codes, and these descriptions were retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002). The Rolemaster rules were that a maximum of one dose per round could be in effect, and a dose was about half an ounce of herb. Addiction was a greater than 100 result on an addiction factor plus d100 roll.

Other Herbs

One anomaly is the absence of Bluestar flower, a small meadow flower that grows high in mountain peaks. While this is an herb that stops "any" infection and doubles healing rate for a day, and indigenous to the Quellbourne region, it does not appear to have been a mechanically implemented healing herb. It appears in the herb chart on page 61 of the Quellbourne (1989) source book, and is described on page 6 under Flora of Quellbourne "Bluestar" (Tomes of Kulthea #1137), though the chart says it is crushed and the description says it is boiled. Bluestar was De-I.C.E.'d as "Blaeston", which is not defined in the modern Elanthian Flora Guide (2002), but it still appears in a few places including the Elven Nations. Winter Street in the Landing was once Bluestar Street, and "Blaeston blossoms" is still capitalized Tessie Brinn's florist shop in Wehnimer's Landing. Bluestar costs 42 gold pieces in the Quellbourne (1989) source book, while Tessie Brinn charges a thousand silvers for a crown of Blaeston blossoms.

Akbutege

Modern: Acantha leaf

"Acantha is one of several herbs in a group which will heal mild concussion  damage when eaten (the leaves are the most beneficial).  It can be found in a  wide range of climates -- from near desert conditions to moist ocean beaches." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Akbutege Leaf is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in semi-arid saltwater coastal regions, but its description in the Hearthstone Manor guide expands this to say it is found in a wide range of climates. The title of this text would have originally said "Medicinal Herbs of Quellbourne", even though some would not grow in Quellbourne's climates. The group of herbs in question probably refers to the Rolemaster table category for concussion relief herbs, where concussion points means hit points. Akbutege Leaf existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

The language from the Hearthstone Manor guide was retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) for acantha leaf. Acanthus is a type of real-world plant, also called bear's breeches, used in folk medicine and herbal teas. Acantha herself is a Greek mythological figure who transformed into the acanthus plant. The word is Greek for "thorn."

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Semi-Arid
Terrain: Ocean Shores
Rarity: 2 - Easy
Addiction Factor: 1
RM Value: 2 silver piece
SW Value: 12 silver piece
Game Details
Rolemaster: Akbutege leaf is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 106, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "concussion relief" and has the effect of healing 1 to 10 hit points when ingested. The climate codes say it is found in semi-arid ocean and saltwater shores. Akbutege is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Akbutege leaf is listed under "concussion relief" on page 15 of the Shadow World Master Atlas: Inhabitants Guide (1989), healing 1 to 10 hit points when chewed and costing 12 silver pieces.
I.C.E. Age: Akbutege Leaf in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its 10 hit point healing property is given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The hit point restoral property is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Akbutege herb is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation.

Arfandas

Modern: Aloeas stem

"The Heliotrope tree, although rare, is famed for its amazing ability to heal serious and critical head wounds.  This is a small tree which tends to grow in  colder, wet areas, such as along riverbanks.  The medicinal properties are best found in the stems of its leaves." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Arfandas Stem is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found along the cold climate shores of freshwater bodies, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. The title of this text would have originally said "Medicinal Herbs of Quellbourne", even though some would not grow in Quellbourne's climates. The Heliotrope tree detail is apparently unique to GemStone, and Arfandas in Rolemaster instead doubles the rate of bone fracture healing when the stem is applied by poultice. Its instant healing of serious head and neck wounds is only true in GemStone.

The language from the Hearthstone Manor guide was retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) for aloeas stem. Aloe is a type of real-world plant used in folk medicine that is originally from tropical climates. However, aloeas retains the same climate characteristics as Arfandas, which came from Rolemaster. Arfandas Stem existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Cold
Terrain: Freshwater Shores
Rarity: 6 - Very Hard
Addiction Factor: 1
RM Value: 2 silver pieces
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: Arfandas stem is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 106, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "bone repair" and has the effect of doubling the rate of healing of fractures when the stem is applied. The climate codes say it is found in cold climate shores of freshwater bodies. Arfandas is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Arfandas does not appear in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Arfandas Stem in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its head and neck wound healing properties are given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The head and neck wound healing property is inconsistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Arfandas tree (listed as a heliotrope) is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation.

Arnuminus

Modern: Ambrominas leaf

"Ambrominas bushes have leaves which are known to speed the healing of minor limb wounds.  Foragers may identify this common bush by its dark green oval leaves, and are behooved to search for it in grasslands and hilly areas." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Arnuminus Leaf is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in short grasses in mild temperate regions, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. The title of this text would have originally said "Medicinal Herbs of Quellbourne", even though some would not grow in Quellbourne's climates. Arnuminas in Rolemaster instead doubles the rate of healing for sprains, torn ligaments, and cartilage damage when the leaf is applied by poultice. Its instant healing of minor limb wounds is only true in GemStone. Arnuminas Leaf existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

The language from the Hearthstone Manor guide was retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) for ambrominas leaf. The description of Arnuminas as a bush, and its having dark green oval leaves, seem to be unique to GemStone III. Ambrominas is not a real-world plant. But "ambro" and "minas" are both recognizably Greek words. If it were intentional it might be interpreted as a small bit of immortality.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Mild Temperate
Terrain: Short Grasses
Rarity: 2 - Easy
Addiction Factor: 8
RM Value: 6 bronze piece
SW Value: 6 bronze piece
Game Details
Rolemaster: Arnuminas leaf is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "muscle, cartilage, and tendon repair" and has the effect of doubling the rate of healing of sprains, torn ligaments, and cartilage damage. The climate codes say it grows in mild temperate short grasses. Arnuminas is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Arnuminas leaf is listed under "muscle, cartilage, and tendon repair" on page 58 of the Journey to the Magic Isle (1989) source book, doubling the rate of healing of sprains, torn ligaments, and cartilage damage from applying it and costing 6 bronze pieces. This is Uman Isle which was partly developed, then later changed and released as Teras Isle. Arnuminas does not appear in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Arnuminas Leaf in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its minor limb wound healing properties are given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The limb healing property is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Arnuminas bush is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation. The hills and grasslands climate description may be consistent with being found on Uman Isle which is temperate.

Baldakur

Modern: Bur-clover potion

The Baldakur root is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in short grasses in cold mountain regions. Baldakur in Rolemaster has the effect of restoring eyesight when the root is brewed and ingested by drinking. Its restoral of a missing eye in GemStone is consistent with its Rolemaster source material. Baldakur Potion existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Bur-clover in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) is only found in the Wehnimer's Landing region, which can arguably be said to be consistent with the Baldakur climate conditions, though the regional climate of Kelfour's Landing was colder in the I.C.E. source material than is the case for Wehnimer's Landing. The Elanthian Flora Guide consistently specifies the root of bur-clover is ground to make potions. "Bur clover" is a real-life plant.

Baldr's brow or Baldr's eyebrow is a real-world plant, but Baldakur originates in Rolemaster, so if it was an inspiration for the name it would have been on the I.C.E. end. Research:The Graveyard speculates on the relevance of the Norse god Baldur to The Graveyard, but the resemblance of Baldakur is a coincidence, though the choice to use it as an herb (instead of other herb possibilities) might not.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Cold
Terrain: Mountains
Rarity: 8 - Sheer Folly
Addiction Factor: 7
RM Value: 102 gold piece
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: Baldakur root/brew is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "organ repair & preservation" and has the effect of restoring sight. The climate codes say it is found in cold mountain regions. Baldakur is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Baldakur does not appear in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Baldakur Potion in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its missing eye restoration property is given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The eye restoration property is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law.

Belrama

Modern: Bolmara potion

The Belramba lichen (spelled with a "b") is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in semi-arid coniferous forests. Belramba in Rolemaster has the effect of repairing nerves when the lichen is brewed and ingested by drinking. It is more expensive than Terbas, Wifurwif, and Yuth, though it is barely more expensive than Wifurwif in Rolemaster. Its repairing of major nerve damage in GemStone is consistent with its Rolemaster source material, though its strength over Wifurwif lichen is GemStone specific. Belrama Potion existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

Bolmara lichen in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) is only found in the Wehnimer's Landing region, and there are places where it could conceivably exist under the I.C.E. climate conditions. However, these conditions are not specified in the modern documentation, only that when ground and steeped in alcohol bolmara can be used to make a powerful nerve healing potion.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Semi-Arid
Terrain: Coniferous Forests
Rarity: 6 - Very Hard
Addiction Factor: 20
RM Value: 60 gold piece
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: Belramba (spelled with a "b") lichen/brew is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "nerve repairs" and has the effect of "nerve repairs." It is listed with only Terbas and Wifurwif, and costs more than them, though it also costs considerably more than Yuth. The climate codes say it is found in semi-arid coniferous forests. Belrama is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Belramba does not appear in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Belrama Potion in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its nerve scar healing property is given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The nerve repair property is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law, where Belramba is the expensive of the three nerve herbs.

Berterin

Modern: Basal moss

"Basal moss is not uncommon, but an important component of an empath's herb inventory. Growing primarily in temperate climates, on the bark of deciduous trees, this moss will provide immediate healing of minor internal and external organ damage." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Berterin moss is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in mild temperate deciduous/mixed forests. Berterin in Rolemaster has the effect of preserving organic materials up to body size for one day when the moss is brewed and ingested by drinking. It is significantly but not drastically less expensive than Pasamar grass, and much less than Baldakur and Wek-wek. Its repairing of body damage in GemStone is loosely consistent with its Rolemaster source material, where it is classified as an organ repairs and preservation herb. Berterin moss existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

Basal moss in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) is only found in the Wehnimer's Landing region, though the I.C.E. climate conditions are dubious for it in the Quellbourne region, which was colder than it is during the Wehnimer's Landing setting. The climate conditions for basal moss in the Elanthian Flora Guide are consistent with its Rolemaster origins and the Hearthstone Manor guide. "Basal" is a word that refers to a bottom layer on a surface, which could describe a moss. But "Basil" is a real-life herb that is used in folk medicine and rituals.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Mild Temperate
Terrain: Deciduous Forests
Rarity: 3 - Light
Addiction Factor: 20
RM Value: 19 gold piece
SW Value: 19 gold piece
Game Details
Rolemaster: Berterin moss/brew is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "organ repairs & presevation" and has the effect of "preservation of organic material" up to body size for 1 day. The climate codes say it grows in mild temperate deciduous/mixed forests. Berterin is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Berterin moss/brew is listed under "organ repairs and regeneration" on page 58 of the Journey to the Magic Isle (1989) source book, having the effect of "preservation of organic material" up to body size for 1 day from drinking it and costing 19 gold pieces. This is Uman Isle which was partly developed, then later changed and released as Teras Isle. Berterin does not appear in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Berterin Moss in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its minor body and eye wound healing property is given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The up-to-whole body preservation property is arguably loosely consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Berterin moss is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation. The Hearthstone description of being primarily found in temperate climates is consistent with Uman Isle.

Bursthelas

Modern: Brostheras potion

The Bursthelas stalk is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in cool temperate short grasses. Bursthelas in Rolemaster has the effect of repairing shattered bones when the stalk is brewed and ingested by drinking. It is much more expensive than Arfandas stem, and somewhat more expensive than Edram moss. Its repairing of serious head/neck damage is specific to GemStone, where the Rolemaster source material would have to be interpreted as meaning skull and neck bone fractures. Bursthelas Potion existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

Brostheras stalk in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) is only found in the Wehnimer's Landing region, though the I.C.E. climate conditions are dubious for it in the Quellbourne region, which was colder than it is during the Wehnimer's Landing setting. The climate conditions for brostheras stalk in the Elanthian Flora Guide are not mentioned, but its being a stalk is consistent with its Rolemaster origins.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Cool Temperate
Terrain: Short Grasses
Rarity: 8 - Sheer Folly
Addiction Factor: 22
RM Value: 110 gold piece
SW Value: 110 gold piece
Game Details
Rolemaster: Bursthelas stalk/bew is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 106, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "bone repair" and has the effect of repairing shattered bones. It is much more expensive than Arfandas stem, and somewhat more expensive than Edram moss. The climate codes say it grows in cool temperate short grasses. Bursthelas is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Bursthelas stalk/brew is listed under "bone repair" on page 58 of the Journey to the Magic Isle (1989) source book, repairing shatters from drinking and costing 110 gold pieces. This is Uman Isle which was partly developed, then later changed and released as Teras Isle. Bursthelas does not appear in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Bursthelas Potion in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its severe head and neck scar healing properties are given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The head/neck scar healing property is arguably inconsistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law.

Curfalaka

Modern: Calamia fruit

"Calamia fruit, famed for its ability to repair serious limb defects, tends to grow in very warm, moist climates.  This large fruit may be identified easily by its light red, almost pink color.  Most efficacious in its dried form, the fresh fruit can also provide some benefit." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Curfalaka Fruit is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in hot and humid jungles, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. The title of this text would have originally said "Medicinal Herbs of Quellbourne", even though some would not grow in Quellbourne's climates. Curfalaka in Rolemaster repairs muscle, tendon, and cartilage when the fruit is eaten. Its instant healing of serious limb defects in GemStone is loosely consistent with the Rolemaster source material. It is much more expensive than the Arnuminas leaf, and somewhat more expensive than Dagmather spine and Edram moss. The Hearthstone Manor description of the fruit as large and light red, but almost pink, seems to be unique to GemStone III. Curfalaka Fruit existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

The language from the Hearthstone Manor guide was retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) for calamia fruit. Calamia fruit only grows around Wehnimer's Landing. While the "very warm, moist" condition is retained, this is not terribly consistent with the regional climate, and Curfalaka is a tropical fruit that grows in hot and humid jungles. This would be inconsistent with the Quellbourne region. Calamintha is a real-world genus of plants that are used as herbs, while calamine is lotion based on zin that is used to treat skin irritation. The word resemblance is conspicuous.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Hot and Humid
Terrain: Jungles
Rarity: 7 - Extremely Hard
Addiction Factor: 6
RM Value: 40 gold piece
SW Value: 40 gold piece
Game Details
Rolemaster: Curfalaka fruit is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "muscle, cartilage, and tendon repair" and has the effect of mending muscle damages by ingesting it. It is much more expensive than the Arnuminas leaf. The climate codes say it grows in hot and humid jungles. Curfalaka is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Curfalaka fruit is in the "specific repairs" herb chart on page 16 of Shadow World Master Atlas: Inhabitants Guide (1989). It "mends muscle damage" by eating it.
I.C.E. Age: Curfalaka Fruit in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its major limb scar healing properties are given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The limb mutilation healing property is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Curfalaka fruit is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation.

Cusamar

Modern: Cothinar flower

"Cothinar flowers are usually found in colder barren areas as they thrive in the winter and do not like having competition for their nutrients.  Not as easily found as Acantha, they are still eagerly sought since they are quite a bit more potent." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Cusamar Flower is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in cold heaths and moors, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. The title of this text would have originally said "Medicinal Herbs of Quellbourne", even though some would not grow in Quellbourne's climates. Cusamar in Rolemaster restores a significant number of hit points when the flower is eaten. Its instant healing of hit points in GemStone is consistent with the Rolemaster source material. It is much more expensive than the Akbutege leaf, somewhat more expensive than Dugmuthur berry, and less expensive than Yavethalion fruit and Gariig cactus. The Hearthstone Manor description of the flower is consistent with the Rolemaster material, but improvises the detail that it is in barren areas as it does not like having competition for nutrients. Cusamar Flower existing in GemStone III dates back to the late I.C.E. Age.

The language from the Hearthstone Manor guide was retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) for cothinar flower. Cothinar flower only grows around Icemule Trace, which is even colder than the Quellbourne region. For some reason Cothinar flower retained its capitalization into the 2000s, when other herbs had been made lower-case. Foraged "cothinar flower" is now lower-case letters.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Cold
Terrain: Heaths
Rarity: 7 - Extremely Hard
Addiction Factor: 3
RM Value: 30 gold piece
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: Cusamar flower is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 106, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "concussion relief" and has the effect of healing "10 + 5xD10" (15 to 60) hit points when ingested. The climate codes say it grows in cold heaths and moors. Cusamar is older than this, but might not be older than the 1995 book.
Shadow World: Cusamar does not appear in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Cusamar Flower in GemStone III may have first been implemented in the late I.C.E. Age. It is not mentioned in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 or Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991, and not mentioned in the Kelfour Editions at all. The hit point restoral property is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Cusamar flower is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation. Cothinar flower retained its capitalization into the 2000s, longer than other De-I.C.E.'d herbs.

Dagmather

Modern: Cactacae spine

"Cactacae cactus grows in desert-like conditions, and should be sought for its sharp spines.  These long brown thorns, when harvested carefully and then chewed, can heal minor scarring and defects on limbs." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Dagmather Spine is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in semi-arid short grasses, which is loosely consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. The title of this text would have originally said "Medicinal Herbs of Quellbourne", even though some would not grow in Quellbourne's climates. Dagmather in Rolemaster restores cartilage damage when the spine is brewed by drinking. Its instant healing of limb scars in GemStone is loosely consistent with the Rolemaster source material, as it is in a muscles and tendons and sprains category, and it heals cartilage rather than muscle or bones. It is much more expensive than the Arnuminas leaf, but less expensive than the Curfalaka fruit. The Hearthstone Manor description of the cactus improvises "semi-arid" into "desert-like", as it is not under the desert climate code in Rolemaster. The description of having long brown thorns and chewing the spines is specific to GemStone. Cactacae Spine existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

The language from the Hearthstone Manor guide was retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) for cactacae cactus. Cactacae cactus only grows around Wehnimer's Landing. There were places in the Quellbourne region, such as the High Plateau, where Dagmather could be consistent. There are badlands and plateaus in the Wehnimer's Landing region that are reasonably consistent with it.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Semi-Arid
Terrain: Short Grasses
Rarity: 5 - Hard
Addiction Factor: 12
RM Value: 28 gold piece
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: Dagmather spine/brew is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "muscle, cartilage, and tendon repair" and has the effect of healing cartilage damage by drinking it. It is much more expensive than the Arnuminas leaf, but less expensive than the Curfalaka fruit. The climate codes say it grows in semi-arid short grasses. Dagmather is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Dagmather does not appear in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Dagmather Spine in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its minor limb scar healing properties are given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The old limb scar healing property is arguably loosely consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Dagmather cactus is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation.

Dugmuthur

Modern: Cuctucae berry

"Dugmuthur berries are able to heal concussion damage, much as the leaves of the Acantha tree, but are somewhat less potent.  The bushes can be found growing wild in higher elevations, and seem to thrive in cooler climates." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor 

The Dugmuthur Berry is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in cool temperate mountains, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. The title of this text would have originally said "Medicinal Herbs of Quellbourne", even though some would not grow in Quellbourne's climates. Dugmuthur in Rolemaster restores concussion damage (i.e. hit points) when the berry is ingested. Its instant healing of 10 hit points in GemStone is consistent with the Rolemaster source material. It is much more expensive than Akbutege leaf, but less expensive than Cusamar flower, Yavethalion fruit, and Gariig cactus. The Hearthstone Manor description of the cactus improvises that it is bush. Dugmuthur Berry existing in GemStone III dates back to the late I.C.E. Age.

The language from the Hearthstone Manor guide was retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) for cuctucae berry. The Hearthstone Guide is a De-I.C.E. anomaly, because it did not change "dugmuthur" to "cuctucae". However, the Elanthian Flora Guide includes the I.C.E. terms as "other names", even though they are archaic. Cuctucae grows around Wehnimer's Landing and Icemule Trace. There were higher elevation places in the Quellbourne region where Dugmuthur could maybe be consistent, but the climate is probably too cold for it, as it is freezing at sea level in the summer.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Cool Temperate
Terrain: Mountains
Rarity: 3 - Light
Addiction Factor: 2
RM Value: 9 gold piece
SW Value: 9 gold piece
Game Details
Rolemaster: Dugmuthur berry is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 106, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "concussion relief" and has the effect of healing 10 hit points when ingested. It is much more expensive than Akbutege leaf, but less expensive than Cusamar flower. The climate codes say it grows in cool temperate mountains. Dugmuthur is older than this, but might not be older than the 1995 book. Though it exists in Shadow World in 1989.
Shadow World: Dugmuthur is listed under "concussion relief" on page 58 of the Journey to the Magic Isle (1989) source book, healing 10 hit points instantly from ingestion and costing 9 gold pieces. This is Uman Isle which was partly developed, then later changed and released as Teras Isle. Dugmuther does not appear in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Dugmuthur Berry in GemStone III dates back to the later I.C.E. Age. It is not mentioned, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991, and does not appear in any of the Kelfour Editions. The hit point restoral property is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Dugmuthur berry is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation. However, opposite from the Rolemaster text, it is less potent than Akbutege. Dugmuthur is also represented in this in-game book as Dugmuthur instead of cuctucae, which is a rare example of a missing/incomplete De-I.C.E. anomaly. Dugmuthur being found natively on Uman Isle, which is temperate, may be consistent with the Hearthstone Manor description.

Edram

Modern: Ephlox moss

"Ephlox moss, a rare fungus with potent healing abilities when used on serious and critical limb wounds, does best in a cold wet environment with ample sunlight to grow.  It should be sought along stream banks or growing on tree bark." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Edram Moss is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in cold places along the shores of freshwater bodies, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. The title of this text would have originally said "Medicinal Herbs of Quellbourne", even though some would not grow in Quellbourne's climates. Edram in Rolemaster mends bone when the moss is ingested by eating it. Its instant healing of fractured and seriously wounded limbs in GemStone is loosely consistent with the Rolemaster source material, as it is in the bone repair category, but does not specify that it heals flesh wounds as well. It is much more expensive than Arfandas stem, and somewhat less expensive than Bursthelas stalk/brew. The Hearthstone Manor description of the moss improvises that it also grows on tree bark. That it is "rare" is consistent with Rolemaster coding, where finding it is rated "8" for "Sheer Folly". Edram Moss existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

The language from the Hearthstone Manor guide was retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) for ephlox moss, but adds details for what it looks like and that it stills the flow of blood. Ephlox only grows around Wehnimer's Landing in the Elanthian Flora Guide. Edram moss was indigenous to the Quellbourne region, being referred to erroneously as "Eram" in the Quellbourne source book.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Cold
Terrain: Freshwater Shores
Rarity: 8 - Sheer Folly
Addiction Factor: 10
RM Value: 31 gold piece
SW Value: 31 gold piece
Game Details
Rolemaster: Edram moss is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 106, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "bone repair" and has the effect of "mending bone" when ingested. It is much more expensive than Arfandas stem, and somewhat less expensive than Bursthelas stalk/brew. The climate codes say it is found on cold coasts of freshwater bodies. Edram is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: There is an "Eram moss" in the herb chart on page 61 of the Quellbourne (1989) source book, and this is consistent with the climate codes for Edram. When ingested it mends bone. It is not in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Edram Moss in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its fractured limb healing properties are given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The serious limb wound healing property is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Edram moss is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation.

Gariig

Modern: Strigae cactus

"The flesh of the Strigae cactus is beneficial in helping to recover from mild concussion damage, however extreme caution must be exercised while harvesting this plant, lest the damage incurred while gathering it outweigh any possible benefit.  The small cacti grow abundantly in desert conditions." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Gariig Cactus is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in arid deserts, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. The title of this text would have originally said "Medicinal Herbs of Quellbourne", even though some would not grow in Quellbourne's climates. Gariig in Rolemaster restores concussion damage (i.e. hit points) when the cactus flesh is ingested. Its instant healing of 30 hit points in GemStone is consistent with the Rolemaster source material. It is much more expensive than Akbutege leaf and Dugmuthur berry, and significantly more expensive than Cusamar flower and Yavethalion fruit. The Hearthstone Manor description of the cactus improvises the hazard in harvesting the plant. Gariig Cactus existing in GemStone III dates back to the late I.C.E. Age.

The language from the Hearthstone Manor guide was retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) for strigae cactus. Strigae grows around Wehnimer's Landing and Icemule Trace. There were desert places in the Quellbourne region, namely the High Plateau, where Gariig could maybe be consistent. Strigae is the plural of "vampire" or "witch" in Latin, and comes from a word that means "screecher" in Greek.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Arid
Terrain: Deserts
Rarity: 3 - Light
Addiction Factor: 3
RM Value: 55 gold piece
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: Gariig cactus (or "Grarig") is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 106, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "concussion relief" and has the effect of healing 30 hit points when ingested. It is much more expensive than Akbutege leaf, more expensive than Dugmuthur, and also more expensive than Cusamar flower, being a flat 30 instead of having a potential to be higher or lower than 30. The climate codes say it grows in arid deserts. Gariig is older than this, but might not be older than the 1995 book.
Shadow World: Gariig is not in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Gariig Cactus in GemStone III dates back to the later I.C.E. Age. It is not mentioned, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991, and does not appear in any of the Kelfour Editions. The "mild concussion" restoral property (actually 30 hit points in game) is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Gariig cactus is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation.

Hegheg

Modern: Haphip root

"The Haphip tree, which typically grows in hot, humid conditions and requires large amounts of moisture, should be sought for a small portion of its root system, which can heal and remove scar tissue around the facial and head areas. Be careful to only harvest a small amount of the root, lest the rare tree be killed." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Hegheg Root is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being (rarely) found in hot and humid short grass regions, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. The title of this text would have originally said "Medicinal Herbs of Quellbourne", even though some would not grow in Quellbourne's climates. Hegheg in Rolemaster instead heals cartilage damage when the leaf is applied as a paste. Its instant healing of facial scars in GemStone is basically consistent with the Rolemaster material. Hegheg Root existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

The language from the Hearthstone Manor guide was retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) for haphip root. The table shows haphip only growing around Wehnimer's Landing, which does not seem all that consistent. Hegheg would not be found in the Quellbourne region, as its climate is far too cold. In GemStone the root is eaten by characters, though healer NPCs do apply herbs by poultice.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Hot and Humid
Terrain: Short Grasses
Rarity: 8 - Sheer Folly
Addiction Factor: 5
RM Value: 25 gold piece
SW Value: 25 gold piece
Game Details
Rolemaster: Hegheg root/paste is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "muscle, cartilage, and tendon repair" and has the effect of healing cartilage damage by applying it. It is much more expensive than the Arnuminas leaf, similar but slightly less in price than Dagmather spine, and less expensive than the Curfalaka fruit. The climate codes say it grows in hot and humid short grasses. Hegheg is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Hegheg is in the "specific repairs" herb hart on page 16 of Shadow World Master Atlas: Inhabitants Guide (1989). It "heals cartilage damage" from boiling, crushing, and poultice.
I.C.E. Age: Hegheg Root in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its minor head scar (scar across the face) healing properties are given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The old face scar healing property is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Hegheg tree is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation.

Mirenna

Modern: Marallis berry

"The Marallis plant produces berries which can help one recover from light concussion damage.  The plants are most commonly found in colder hills and mountains." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Mirenna Berry is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being (commonly) found in cold mountain regions, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. The title of this text would have originally said "Medicinal Herbs of Quellbourne", even though some would not grow in Quellbourne's climates. Mirenna in Rolemaster restores concussion damage (i.e. hit points) when the berry is ingested. Its instant healing of 10 hit points in GemStone is consistent with the Rolemaster source material. It is much more expensive than Akbutege leaf, almost the same price as Dugmuthur berry, and significantly less expensive than Cusamar flower, Yavethalion fruit, Gariig cactus, and Bluestar flower. Mirenna Berry existing in GemStone III dates back to the late I.C.E. Age.

The language from the Hearthstone Manor guide was retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) for "marillis berry", which is a different spelling, and adding the detail that they are small red berries. Marillis only grows around Wehnimer's Landing. Mirenna was indigenous to the Quellbourne region, being listed in the Quellbourne (1989) source book. However, it was not mechanically an herb until later, apparently. It is not as poweful or expensive an herb as Bluestar blossom (now "blaeston"), which was a word used dating back to 1990, but was never made mechanically an herb.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Cold
Terrain: Mountains
Rarity: 3 - Light
Addiction Factor: 1
RM Value: 10 gold piece
SW Value: 15 gold piece
Game Details
Rolemaster: Mirenna berry is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 106, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "concussion relief" and has the effect of healing 10 hit points when ingested. It is much more expensive than Akbutege leaf, similarly priced but slightly more expensive than Dugmuthur, but less expensive than Cusamar flower and Gariig cactus. It is only a third as expensive as Bluestar blossom, which is much more powerful, but was not implemented mechanically as an herb. The climate codes say it grows in cold mountains. Mirenna is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Mirenna berry is in the herb chart on page 61 of the Quellbourne (1989) source book, and this is consistent with the climate codes. When ingested it heals 10 concussion points instantly. It is not in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Marallis Berry in GemStone III dates back to the later I.C.E. Age, though it is in the Quellbourne source book from 1989. It is not mentioned, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991, and does not appear in any of the Kelfour Editions. The hit point restoral property is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Marallis berry is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation. Marallis is misspelled as "Marillis" in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002).

Pasamar

Modern: Pothinir grass

"Pothinir grass, a must for any emergency kit, is indispensable for its ability to heal serious internal and external injuries, and perhaps just as well known for its terrible taste.  Although extremely difficult to find, it is however well worth the effort. The best places to look for it are hot, humid areas which get large amounts of sunlight." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Pasamar Grass is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being (rarely) found in hot and humid short grass regions, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. Pasamar in Rolemaster has the effect of preserving organic materials without a time limit, unlike Berterin moss, when the grass is brewed and ingested by drinking. It is significantly but not drastically more expensive than Berterin moss, and much less than Baldakur and Wek-wek. Pasamar is only slightly less expensive than Siran clove in Rolemaster. Its repairing of serious internal and external organ damage in GemStone is consistent with its Rolemaster source material, where it is classified as an organ repairs and preservation herb. Pasamar Grass existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

Pothinir grass in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) is only found in the Wehnimer's Landing region, though it could not have existed in the Quellbourne region, which was colder than it is during the Wehnimer's Landing setting. The Elanthian Flora Guide invents that pothinir is "medium green-bladed tufts." In the real-world "pothos" is a plant called Devil's ivy, and Pothinus is an historical Greek name, including a martyred saint who died of bodily injuries and the eunuch who gave Julius Caesar the severed head of Pompey. But both of these could easily be unintentional coincidences.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Hot and Humid
Terrain: Short Grasses
Rarity: 8 - Sheer Folly
Addiction Factor: 40
RM Value: 75 gold piece
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: Pasamar grass/brew is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "organ repairs & presevation" and has the effect of "preserves organic material" (apparently from drinking it), without a time limit, unlike with Berterin moss. It is significantly more expensive than Berterin, but only slightly less expensive than Siran, significantly less expensive than Baldakur, and much less expensive than Wek-wek. The climate codes say it grows in hot and humid short grasses. Pasamar is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Pasamar is not in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Pasamar Grass in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its major body and eye wound healing property is given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The body preservation property is arguably loosely consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Pasamar grass is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation.

Rewk

Modern: Rose-marrow potion

The Rewk nodule/brew is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in cool temperate deciduous or mixed forests. The Hearthstone Manor guide does not give any description to Rewk. Rewk potion and Arfandas stem are not head/neck specific in Rolemaster, and fall under different categories, where unlike in GemStone the Rewk is actually more expensive than Arfandas stem. In Rolemaster it heals concussion points (hit points) but twice as powerful as Akbutege leaf. It is three times more expensive than Akbutege leaf, and much less expensive than Dugmuthur, Cusamar flower, Mirenna berry, Bluestar flower, and Gariig cactus. Rewk Potion existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

The Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) was kept consistent with the Rolemaster origins, with rose-marrow potion being made from "nodules" of roots of the rose-marrow plant. In the table it only grows around Wehnimer's Landing. The Elanthian Flora Guide adds details of growing in stalks, with staggered blackish-green leaves, and scarlet edged white blossoms with small rounded seed pods. Rose-marrow in GemStone is a member of the leguminous family. In the real-world "rose mallow" is another name for the hibiscus flower, which is an herb used in folk medicine.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Cool Temperate
Terrain: Deciduous Forests
Rarity: 3 - Light
Addiction Factor: 1
RM Value: 9 silver pieces
SW Value: 9 silver pieces
Game Details
Rolemaster: Rewk nodule/brew is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 106, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "concussion relief" and has the effect of healing 2 to 20 hit points from drinking. It is similarly priced but somewhat more expensive than Akbutege leaf, and much less expensive than Dugmuthur, Cusamar flower, and Gariig cactus. Rewk and Arfandas are not head/neck specific and fall under different categories, and Rewk is actually more expensive than Arfandas in the 1999 book. The climate codes say it grows in cool temperate deciduous/mixed forests. Rewk is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Rewk nodule/brew is listed under "concussion relief" on page 58 of the Journey to the Magic Isle (1989) source book, healing 2 to 20 hit points from drinking and costing 9 silver pieces. This is Uman Isle which was partly developed, then later changed and released as Teras Isle. Rewk is not in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Rewk Potion in GemStone III in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its minor head/neck wound healing property is given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The minor head/neck flesh healing property is arguably inconsistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law.

Siran

Modern: Sovyn clove

"The small dried flowers (also known as cloves) of the Sovyn bush have the miraculous ability to cause the regeneration of an entire limb!  These flowers need to have been dried by the sun in order to have their restorative powers; therefore, the time at which this herb is picked is crucial." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Siran Clove is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in semi-arid short grass regions. However, in Rolemaster the Siran clove also inflicts a skin disease when eaten, which causes the person to take damage per round when exposed to full sunlight. This is not the case in GemStone's implementation, and the Hearthstone Manor description changes this to the sun being important for when it is picked, as the flower has to be dried in the sun to have its powers. Siran in Rolemaster has the effect of restoring one organ or area from eating it. It is significantly more expensive than Berterin, but only slightly more expensive than Pasamar, significantly less expensive than Baldakur, and much less expensive than Tarnas (unlike GemStone) and Wek-wek. Its restoration of missing limbs in GemStone is consistent with its Rolemaster source material, where it is classified as an organ repairs and preservation herb. Siran Clove existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

Sovyn clove in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) is only found in the Wehnimer's Landing region. There may have been places Siran could have existed in Quellbourne, but the region was probably too cold. The Elanthian Flora Guide is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor description, which improvises that the plant is a bush with small flowers dried in the sun in order to have its medicinal powers.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Semi-Arid
Terrain: Short Grasses
Rarity: 6 - Very Hard
Addiction Factor: 31
RM Value: 80 gold pieces
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: Siran clove is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "organ repairs & presevation" and has the effect of restoring one organ or area from eating it. It is significantly more expensive than Berterin, but only slightly more expensive than Pasamar, significantly less expensive than Baldakur, and much less expensive than Tarnas and Wek-wek. Interestingly, it causes a skin disease as a side effect, reducing appearance by 1 to 10 and causing 6 hits per round when exposed to full sunlight. The climate codes say it grows in semi-arid short grasses. Siran is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Siran is not in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Siran Clove in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its missing limb restoral property is given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The area restoral property is arguably loosely consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law, but it does not impose the skin disease effect. The Siran bush is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation. It is possible the time of day of picking, dried by the sun, description is inspired by the sunlight damage in Rolemaster.

Tarnas

Modern: Talneo potion

The Tarnas nodule/brew is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in hot and humid jungles and rainforests. The Hearthstone Manor guide does not describe it. Tarnas in Rolemaster has the effect of repairing organ damage from drinking it. It is significantly more expensive than Berterin, Pasamar, Siran, and Baldakur, and the exact same price as Wek-wek. Tarnas is more addictive than Wek-wek and causes 1 to 10 hours of nausea when ingested. Its body and eye scar healing in GemStone is loosely consistent with its Rolemaster source material, where it is classified as an organ repairs and preservation herb. However, its weakness relative to Wekwek in GemStone is exaggerated, it might even be more powerful in Rolemaster. Tarnas Potion existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

Talneo potion in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) is only found in the Wehnimer's Landing region. The Elanthian Flora Guide is consistent with Rolemaster in that it is the "nodules" of the talneo plant roots that are used to make healing potions. It does not refer to the climate conditions and improvises details, such as being a member of the leguminous family (which was also done in the case of rose-marrow), with stalks and perwinkle blue flowers and yellow-green leaves with yellow seed pods. Tarnas would not have been able to grow in the Quellbourne region as it was too cold.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Hot and Humid
Terrain: Jungles
Rarity: 6 - Very Hard
Addiction Factor: 60
RM Value: 220 gold piece
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: Tarnas nodule/brew is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "organ repairs & presevation" and has the effect of repairing organ damage from drinking it. It is significantly more expensive than Berterin, Pasamar, and Baldakur, but exactly the same price as Wek-wek. The difference between Tarnas and Wek-wek is that Tarnas causes nausea for 1 to 10 hours and is slightly more likely to cause addiction. The climate codes say it grows in hot and humid jungles. Tarnas is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Tarnas is not in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Tarnas Potion in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its internal and external organ scar healing property is given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The body/eye scar healing property is arguably loosely consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law, but its weakness compared to Wek-wek is exaggerated in GemStone.

Terbas

Modern: Torban leaf

"The leaves of the Torban tree have been proven an effective treatment for certain minor nervous system defects such as slurred speech.  Found only in mild climates, the tree is not difficult to find, but special care must be exercised to harvest the leaves in the proper stage of growth, as they are otherwise useless except for tea-making." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Terbas leaf is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in mild temperate deciduous and mixed forests, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. Terbas leaf in Rolemaster has the effect of doubling the healing rate of nerve damage when applied by poultice rather than eating. It is much less expensive than Belramba, Wifurwif, and Yuth. Its repairing of minor nerve defects in GemStone is loosely consistent with its Rolemaster source material, though in GemStone it is an instant effect instead of a doubled rate of healing. Terbas Leaf existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

Torban leaf in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) is only found in the Wehnimer's Landing region, though the Quellbourne region was probably too cold for it. The Elanthian Flora Guide is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide, which improvised that Terbas is a tree, and that the leaves must come fom a proper stage of growth or only be useful for tea-making.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Mild Temperate
Terrain: Deciduous Forests
Rarity: 3 - Light
Addiction Factor: 4
RM Value: 2 gold piece
SW Value: 2 gold piece
Game Details
Rolemaster: Terbas leaf is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "nerve repairs" and has the effect of doubling the healing rate of nerve damage when applied. Terbas is much less expensive than Belramba, Wifurwif, and Yuth. The climate codes say it grows it mild temperate deciduous/mixed forests. Terbas is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Terbas leaf is listed under "nerve repair" on page 58 of the Journey to the Magic Isle (1989) source book, doubling the rate of healing of nerve damage from applying it and costing 2 gold pieces. This is Uman Isle which was partly developed, then later changed and released as Teras Isle. Terbas is not in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Terbas Leaf in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its nerve defect healing property is given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The minor nerve repair property is arguably loosely consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law, though in GemStone it is an instant effect and not a doubled healing rate. The Terbas tree is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation. The Hearthstone description of only being found in "mild climates" consistent with being found on Uman Isle which is temperate.

Wekwek

Modern: Wingstem potion

The Wek-wek nodule/brew is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in hot and humid jungles and rainforests. The Hearthstone Manor guide did not describe Wekwek. Wekwek in Rolemaster has the effect of repairing organ damage from drinking it. It is significantly more expensive than Berterin, Pasamar, and Baldakur, but exactly the same price as Tarnas. The difference between Tarnas and Wek-wek is that Tarnas causes nausea for 1 to 10 hours and is slightly more likely to cause addiction. Its repairing of serious body and eye defects in GemStone is loosely consistent with its Rolemaster source material, though its power over Tarnas is specific to GemStone. Wekwek Potion existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

Wingstem potion in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) is only found in the Wehnimer's Landing region, though the Quellbourne region was too cold for it. The Elanthian Flora Guide is consistent with the Rolemaster source material in that the potion is made from the nodules of the plant root. It improvised that wingstem is a "legume", as it did for rose-marrow and talneo, and justified the name: "Pairs of pale green wing-shaped leaves offset small lavender flowers with yellow centers." Wingstem is a real-world plant of the aster family called yellow ironweed.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Hot and Humid
Terrain: Jungles
Rarity: 8 - Sheer Folly
Addiction Factor: 50
RM Value: 220 gold piece
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: Wek-wek nodule/brew is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "organ repairs & presevation" and has the effect of repairing organ damage from drinking it. It is significantly more expensive than Berterin, Pasamar, and Baldakur, but exactly the same price as Tarnas. The difference between Tarnas and Wek-wek is that Tarnas causes nausea for 1 to 10 hours and is slightly more likely to cause addiction. The climate codes say it grows in hot and humid jungles. Wekwek is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Wek-wek is not in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Wekwek Potion in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its serious internal and external organ scar healing property is given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The serious body/eye scar healing property is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law, but its strength compared to Tarnas is exaggerated in GemStone.

Wifurwif

Modern: Wolifrew lichen

"Wolifrew lichen, a fungus known for its ability to cure nervous system disorders, grows in cold, dark areas.  While sometimes this includes secluded outdoor areas, the lichen is much more likely to be found inside a cold, wet cave. Its yellow-brown color makes it distinguishable from other fungi." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Wifurwif lichen is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being found in cool temperate mountains, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. Wifurwif lichen in Rolemaster has the effect of repairing nerves when ingested. It is much more expensive than Terbas, and only slightly less expensive than Belramba. It is significantly more expensive than Yuth flower in Rolemaster. Its repairing of minor nerve maladies in GemStone is consistent with its Rolemaster source material, though its weakness compared to Belrama is specific to GemStone. Wifurwif Lichen existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

Wolifrew lichen in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) is only found in the Wehnimer's Landing region, and Wifurwif might have been able to exist in the Quellbourne region. The Elanthian Flora Guide is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide, which improvised that Wifurwif is distinguishable as a yellow-brown fungus. Lichens are not really fungi, they are composite organisms containing fungus.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Cool Temperate
Terrain: Mountains
Rarity: 7 - Extremely Hard
Addiction Factor: 15
RM Value: 55 gold piece
SW Value: 55 gold piece
Game Details
Rolemaster: Wifurwif lichen is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 107, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "nerve repairs" and has the effect of "nerve repairs". Wifurwif is much more expensive than Terbas and only slightly less than Belramba, though it is more expensive than Yuth in the 1999 book. The climate codes say it grows in cool temperate mountains. Wifurwif is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Wifurwif lichen is listed under "nerve repair" on page 58 of the Journey to the Magic Isle (1989) source book, having the effect of "nerve repairs" from eating it and costing 55 gold pieces. This is Uman Isle which was partly developed, then later changed and released as Teras Isle. Wifurwif is not in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Wifurwif Lichen in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its nerve "twitching" healing property is given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The minor nerve healing property is arguably loosely consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law, though in GemStone its weakness compared to Belramba is exaggerated. The Wifurwif lichen is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation. Since it is defined as a cave lichen, this is not necessarily inconsistent with being found on Uman Isle, which is temperate.

Yavethalion

Modern: Yabathilium fruit

"Yabathilium, an uncommon tree which grows on beaches and saltwater coastlines, produces a small greenish fruit which, though extremely bitter, has amazing concussion restoration powers." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Yavethalion Fruit is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being (uncommonly) found along mild temperate saltwater and ocean coasts, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. The title of this text would have originally said "Medicinal Herbs of Quellbourne", even though some would not grow in Quellbourne's climates. Yavethalion in Rolemaster restores concussion damage (i.e. hit points) when the fruit is ingested. Its instant healing of many hit points in GemStone is consistent with the Rolemaster source material. It is much more expensive than Akbutege leaf, significantly more expensive than Dugmuthur and Mirenna berry, more expensive than Cusamar flower, almost the same price as Bluestar flower, and less expensive than Gariig cactus. Yavethalion Fruit existing in GemStone III dates back to the late I.C.E. Age.

The language from the Hearthstone Manor guide was retained in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) for yabathilium berry. The Quellbourne region would have been too cold for Yavethlion fruit. Yabathilium is listed as growing around Wehnimer's Landing and Ta'Illistim, where the latter is inconsistent with the description of where it grows. The Hearthstone Guide improvised that it was a small greenish fruit from a tree and extremely bitter.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Mild Temperate
Terrain: Ocean Shores
Rarity: 5 - Hard
Addiction Factor: 4
RM Value: 45 gold piece
SW Value: 45 gold piece
Game Details
Rolemaster: Yavethalion fruit is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 106, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "concussion relief" and has the effect of healing 5 to 50 hit points when ingested. It is much more expensive than Akbutege leaf, significantly more expensive than Dugmuthur, somewhat more expensive than Cusamar flower, and similarly priced but somewhat less expensive than Gariig cactus. It has the potential to be weaker or stronger than Gariig. The climate codes say it grows along mild temperate ocean and saltwater coasts. Yavethalion is older than this, but might not be older than the 1995 book. Though it exists in Shadow World in 1989.
Shadow World: Yavethalion fruit is listed under "concussion relief" on page 58 of the Journey to the Magic Isle (1989) source book, healing 5 to 50 hit points from ingestion and costing 45 gold pieces. This is Uman Isle which was partly developed, then later changed and released as Teras Isle. Yavethalion is not in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Yavethalion Fruit in GemStone III dates back to the later I.C.E. Age. It is not mentioned, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991, and does not appear in any of the Kelfour Editions. The relatively strong hit point restoral property is arguably consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law. The Yavethalion fruit is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation. This description is potentially consistent with coming from a temperate island climate like Uman Isle.

Yuth

Modern: Woth flower

"Woth, an exceedingly rare and beautiful flower which heals serious nervous system defects when eaten, grows most often in hot, humid, dark climates, such as a rain forest.  These flowers, when in full bloom, have a blue throat surrounded by ruffled violet petals." - Medicinal Herbs of Elanith, Heathstone Manor

The Yuth flower is defined in the Rolemaster source books as being (rarley) found in hot and humid jungles and rainforests, which is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide description. Yuth flower in Rolemaster has the effect of being a level 20 antidote to nerve venoms when ingested. It is much more expensive than Terbas, but significantly less expensive than Wifurwif and Belramba. Its repairing of serious nerve defects in GemStone is only very loosely consistent with its Rolemaster source material, as in GemStone it is an instant healing of spasms and uncontrollable motions. It does not cure the state of being poisoned in GemStone, where poisons in GemStone mechanically only do hit point damages. Yuth Flower existing in GemStone III dates back to 1990.

Woth flower in the Elanthian Flora Guide (2002) is only found in the Wehnimer's Landing region, and the Quellbourne region was probably too cold for it. This is inconsistent with the description, which retains the language that it is native to rainforests, except that it loosens the wording to saying it "grows best" under those conditions. It implies that woth flower is originally a foreign plant to the Darkstone Bay region. The Elanthian Flora Guide is consistent with the Hearthstone Manor guide, which improvised that the flower in full bloom is blue throated and surrounded by ruffled violet petals.

Rolemaster Statistics
Climate: Hot and Humid
Terrain: Jungles
Rarity: 8 - Sheer Folly
Addiction Factor: 8
RM Value: 29 gold piece
SW Value: N/A
Game Details
Rolemaster: Wifurwif flower is listed in Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law (1999), page 106, which also had a 1995 printing. It is under "antidotes" and has the effect of "level 20 antidote for nerve venoms" when ingested. Yuth is much more expensive than Terbas but significantly less than Wifurwif and Belramba. The climate codes say it grows in hot and humid jungles. Yuth is older than this and has to be found in an earlier Rolemaster book.
Shadow World: Yuth is not in the Shadow World Master Atlas, 1st Edition (1989) World Guide or Inhabitants Guide.
I.C.E. Age: Yuth Flower in GemStone III dates back to 1990. Its major nerve damage healing property is given, for example, in Kelfour Edition volume I number III from August 1990 and Kelfour Edition volume II number I from June 1991. The spasms and moving healing property is arguably loosely consistent with the 1999 edition of Rolemaster: Gamemaster Law, though in GemStone it is not an antidote to nerve venom. The Yuth flower is described in an I.C.E. Age guide in Hearthstone Manor, which is probably unique to the GemStone implementation.

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